Impact of age on renal graft survival in children after the first rejection episode

Elizabeth Ingulli, Arthur J Matas, Thomas E Nevins, Clifford Kashtan, Michael Mauer, Kristen J Gillingham, Blanche M Chavers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Infants are thought to be more immunoreactive and at a greater risk for developing irreversible rejection compared with older children. We investigated this by analyzing patient and graft survival rates, incidence of acute rejection, reversibility of acute rejection, development of a subsequent acute rejection, and incidence of graft loss due to rejection in 154 children (<18 years of age) after primary renal transplantation. Most patients (n = 139) were treated with quadruple immunosuppression (antibody, azathioprine, prednisone, cyclosporine). Treatment of the first acute rejection episode (ARE) consisted of antibody and increased prednisone (68%) or increased prednisone alone (30%), and was not significantly different between the age groups. Transplants were from living donors (LRD) in 80% of cases. Patients were followed for at least 1 year (mean 58±30 months); 68% (105/154) of recipients experienced 1 or more ARE. The incidence of ARE was significantly lower in patients <2 years of age (45%) compared with patients 2-5 (76%, P = 0.01), 6-12 (78%, P = 0.005), and 13-17 (76%, P = 0.009) years of age. There was no significant difference in the 1-, 2- and 5-year patient or graft survival rates, the development of a subsequent acute rejection, or the incidence of graft loss due to acute rejection when analyzed by age group. These data suggest that the impact of an ARE is similar for younger and older children in our population receiving predominantly LRD transplants and quadruple immunosuppression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)474-478
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Nephrology
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 22 1996

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Graft Survival
Kidney
Prednisone
Incidence
Transplants
Immunosuppression
Survival Rate
Age Groups
Antibodies
Living Donors
Azathioprine
Graft Rejection
Kidney Transplantation
Cyclosporine
Population

Keywords

  • Graft rejection
  • Renal transplantation

Cite this

Impact of age on renal graft survival in children after the first rejection episode. / Ingulli, Elizabeth; Matas, Arthur J; Nevins, Thomas E; Kashtan, Clifford; Mauer, Michael; Gillingham, Kristen J; Chavers, Blanche M.

In: Pediatric Nephrology, Vol. 10, No. 4, 22.08.1996, p. 474-478.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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