Impact of a Prostate Specific Antigen Screening Decision Aid on Clinic Function

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction Decision aids for prostate cancer screening can increase knowledge and shared decision making, but remain underused due to cost and time constraints that disrupt clinic flow. We examined the impact of a simple prostate specific antigen screening decision aid distribution strategy on clinic flow as well as shared decision making in a diverse, urban primary care clinic. Methods Men 50 to 75 years old viewed the decision aid while waiting for physicians. Participants and physicians completed questionnaires evaluating the shared decision making process. Focus groups were conducted with clinic staff and physicians to evaluate the impact on clinic operations. Results Overall 50% of men discussed prostate specific antigen screening and 85% reported the decision aid made decision making easier. Participants reported an average of 12.9 minutes reading the decision aid, with high decision satisfaction and low decisional conflict. Physicians reported an average of 5.2 minutes discussing prostate specific antigen screening. Clinic staff reported increased enthusiasm for the process after adjustments were made in response to concerns including time, as well as lack of knowledge about the decision aid subject matter and involvement in the process. Physician reported barriers included ambivalence about prostate specific antigen screening. Conclusions A prostate specific antigen screening decision aid, requiring few resources, can be implemented with broad involvement of clinic staff and minimal disruption to clinic flow in an urban primary care clinic, and may facilitate shared decision making.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)448-453
Number of pages6
JournalUrology Practice
Volume4
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

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Decision Support Techniques
Prostate-Specific Antigen
Decision Making
Physicians
Primary Health Care
Social Adjustment
Focus Groups
Early Detection of Cancer
Reading
Prostatic Neoplasms
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • clinical
  • decision support systems
  • prostate-specific antigen
  • prostatic neoplasms

Cite this

Impact of a Prostate Specific Antigen Screening Decision Aid on Clinic Function. / Warlick, Christopher A; Berge, Jerica M; Ho, Yen Yi; Yeazel, Mark W.

In: Urology Practice, Vol. 4, No. 6, 01.11.2017, p. 448-453.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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