Impact of a multi-disciplinary patient education session on accrual to a difficult clinical trial: the Toronto experience with the surgical prostatectomy versus interstitial radiation intervention trial. Wallace K, Fleshner N, Jewett M, Basiuk J, Crook J, Department of Radiation Medicine and the Division of Urology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada

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Abstract

Purpose: Random assignment to clinical trials involving different treatment modalities can be difficult. We describe our experience with the Surgical Prostatectomy Versus Interstitial Radiation Intervention Trial (SPIRIT; ACOSOG Z0070 NCIC PR10), a randomized trial for early-stage prostate cancer comparing radical prostatectomy (RP), and brachytherapy (BT). A multidisciplinary educational session was developed to improve patient understanding of treatment options and to facilitate accrual. Patients and Methods: Prostate cancer referrals were screened and men who met favorable risk criteria (T1c/T2a, prostate-specific antigen [PSA] < 10 ng/mL, Gleason < or = 6) were invited to a structured education session before a specialty consultation. Men and their partners viewed the SPIRIT informed-consent video and heard from a cancer patient who described his participation in a randomized trial. Then, a urologist and radiation oncologist together compared and contrasted RP and BT to establish the rationale for the trial. Results: In May 2002, SPIRIT opened for accrual and was endorsed by the University Health Network urologists and radiation oncologists. The first 27 eligible patients were approached about SPIRIT, consulted both specialties, and viewed an educational video. No patients consented. The multidisciplinary education session was then introduced. Forty-seven education sessions with 263 patients resulted in 34 consents. Of 203 patients who were suitable for the study but declined random assignment, 62 chose surgery, 94 chose brachytherapy, three patients chose external radiotherapy, and 11 chose no treatment. Consent rates for eligible and suitable patients were one in six. Conclusion: Men who understand their treatment options and trial rationale as presented jointly by representative specialists from competing treatment modalities may be better equipped to make an informed decision and are more likely to consent to random assignment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)91-92
Number of pages2
JournalUrologic Oncology: Seminars and Original Investigations
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2007

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