Impact of a Medical Journal Club on House-Staff Reading Habits, Knowledge, and Critical Appraisal Skills: A Randomized Control Trial

Mark Linzer, J. Trig Brown, Linda M. Frazier, Elizabeth R. Delong, William C. Siegel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

180 Scopus citations

Abstract

The journal club is an established teaching modality in many house-staff training programs. To determine if a journal club improves house-staff reading habits, knowledge of epidemiology and biostatistics, and critical appraisal skills, we randomized 44 medical interns to receive either a journal club or a control seminar series. A test instrument developed by the Delphi method was administered before and after the interventions (mean, five journal club sessions). By self-report, 86% of the house staff in the journal club group improved their reading habits vs 0% in the control group. Knowledge scores increased more in the journal club group than in the control group, and a trend was found toward more knowledge gained as more sessions were attended. Ability to appraise critically a test article increased slightly in each group, but there was no significant difference between the groups. We conclude that a journal club is a powerful motivator of critical house-staff reading behavior and can help teach epidemiology and biostatistics to physicians-in-training.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2537-2541
Number of pages5
JournalJAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume260
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 4 1988

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