Immigrant Chinese American Women: Negotiating Values and Perceptions of Self in the Cultural Borderlands of East and West: A Qualitative Study

Soh Leong Lim, Elizabeth Wieling

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

This phenomenological study looked at how immigrant Chinese American women negotiate differences in values and perceptions of the self in the cultural borderlands of East andWest. In-depth interviews were conducted with 10 women. Participants were raised in the East and are now residing and raising their children in aWestern context. Predominant themes that emerged were the contradictions and ambiguities experienced in the struggle to be both adaptive and culturally appropriate in the new context. Also, it was found that organizing principles remained largely unchanged over the two generations. The experiences of these women suggest that assimilation is a long-term and ongoing process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)148-158
Number of pages11
JournalThe Family Journal
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2004

Keywords

  • assimilation
  • cultural borderlands
  • immigrant
  • self
  • values
  • women

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