Immediate neurophysiological effects of transcranial electrical stimulation

Anli Liu, Mihály Vöröslakos, Greg Kronberg, Simon Henin, Matthew R. Krause, Yu Huang, Alexander Opitz, Ashesh Mehta, Christopher C. Pack, Bart Krekelberg, Antal Berényi, Lucas C. Parra, Lucia Melloni, Orrin Devinsky, György Buzsáki

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Noninvasive brain stimulation techniques are used in experimental and clinical fields for their potential effects on brain network dynamics and behavior. Transcranial electrical stimulation (TES), including transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS), has gained popularity because of its convenience and potential as a chronic therapy. However, a mechanistic understanding of TES has lagged behind its widespread adoption. Here, we review data and modelling on the immediate neurophysiological effects of TES in vitro as well as in vivo in both humans and other animals. While it remains unclear how typical TES protocols affect neural activity, we propose that validated models of current flow should inform study design and artifacts should be carefully excluded during signal recording and analysis. Potential indirect effects of TES (e.g., peripheral stimulation) should be investigated in more detail and further explored in experimental designs. We also consider how novel technologies may stimulate the next generation of TES experiments and devices, thus enhancing validity, specificity, and reproducibility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number5092
JournalNature communications
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2018

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stimulation
Brain
Design of experiments
Animals
Experiments
brain
Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation
Artifacts
Research Design
animals
artifacts
therapy
Technology
alternating current
Equipment and Supplies
direct current
recording

Cite this

Liu, A., Vöröslakos, M., Kronberg, G., Henin, S., Krause, M. R., Huang, Y., ... Buzsáki, G. (2018). Immediate neurophysiological effects of transcranial electrical stimulation. Nature communications, 9(1), [5092]. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-07233-7

Immediate neurophysiological effects of transcranial electrical stimulation. / Liu, Anli; Vöröslakos, Mihály; Kronberg, Greg; Henin, Simon; Krause, Matthew R.; Huang, Yu; Opitz, Alexander; Mehta, Ashesh; Pack, Christopher C.; Krekelberg, Bart; Berényi, Antal; Parra, Lucas C.; Melloni, Lucia; Devinsky, Orrin; Buzsáki, György.

In: Nature communications, Vol. 9, No. 1, 5092, 01.12.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Liu, A, Vöröslakos, M, Kronberg, G, Henin, S, Krause, MR, Huang, Y, Opitz, A, Mehta, A, Pack, CC, Krekelberg, B, Berényi, A, Parra, LC, Melloni, L, Devinsky, O & Buzsáki, G 2018, 'Immediate neurophysiological effects of transcranial electrical stimulation', Nature communications, vol. 9, no. 1, 5092. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-07233-7
Liu A, Vöröslakos M, Kronberg G, Henin S, Krause MR, Huang Y et al. Immediate neurophysiological effects of transcranial electrical stimulation. Nature communications. 2018 Dec 1;9(1). 5092. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-07233-7
Liu, Anli ; Vöröslakos, Mihály ; Kronberg, Greg ; Henin, Simon ; Krause, Matthew R. ; Huang, Yu ; Opitz, Alexander ; Mehta, Ashesh ; Pack, Christopher C. ; Krekelberg, Bart ; Berényi, Antal ; Parra, Lucas C. ; Melloni, Lucia ; Devinsky, Orrin ; Buzsáki, György. / Immediate neurophysiological effects of transcranial electrical stimulation. In: Nature communications. 2018 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.
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