Immediate and short-term effects of mulligan concept positional sustained natural apophyseal glides on an athletic young-adult population classified with mechanical neck pain: an exploratory investigation

Dawn P. Andrews, Kari B. Odland-Wolf, James May, Russell Baker, Alan Nasypany, Eric M. Dinkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: Mechanical neck pain (MNP) is common in the athletic population. While symptoms may present at the cervical spine for patients complaining of MNP, thoracic spinal alignment or dysfunction may influence cervical positioning and overall cervical function. Clinicians often employ cervical high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) thrust manipulations to treat MNP, albeit with a small level of inherent risk. Mulligan Concept positional sustained natural apophyseal glides (SNAGs) directed at the cervicothoracic region are emerging to treat patients with cervical pain and dysfunction, as evidence supporting an interdependent relationship between the thoracic and cervical spine grows. The purpose of this a priori study was to evaluate outcome measures of patients classified with MNP treated with the Mulligan Concept Positional SNAGs. Methods: Ten consecutive young-adult patients, ages ranging from 15 to 18 years (mean = 16.5 ± 1.78), classified with MNP were treated utilizing Mulligan Concept Positional SNAGs. The Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), Disablement in the Physically Active (DPAS), and Fear-Avoidance Based Questionnaire-Physical Activity (FABQPA) were collected for inclusion criteria and to identify patient-reported pain and dysfunction. Results: Patients reported decreases in pain on the NRS [5.4 to.16, p = .001], increases in function on the PSFS [5.2 to 10, p = .001], and increases in cervical range of motion (CROM) [ext p = .003, flex p = .009, left rot p = .001, right rot p = .002] immediately post-treatment and between treatments. Discussion: Positional SNAGs directed at the cervicothoracic region may address a variety of patient reported symptoms for MNP, and the number of treatment sessions needed for symptom resolution may be closer to a single session rather than multiple treatments. Level of Evidence: 4.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)203-211
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Manual and Manipulative Therapy
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 8 2018
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018, © 2018 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Keywords

  • Mechanical neck pain
  • cervicothoracic junction
  • mobilization with movement

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