Imaging the distribution of iron oxide nanoparticles in hypothermic perfused tissues

Hattie L. Ring, Zhe Gao, Anirudh Sharma, Zonghu Han, Charles Lee, Kelvin G.M. Brockbank, Elizabeth D. Greene, Kristi L. Helke, Zhen Chen, Lia H. Campbell, Bradley Weegman, Monica Davis, Michael Taylor, Sebastian Giwa, Gregory M. Fahy, Brian Wowk, Roberto Pagotan, John C. Bischof, Michael Garwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Herein, we evaluate the use of MRI as a tool for assessing iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP) distribution within IONP perfused organs and vascularized composite allografts (VCAs) (i.e., hindlimbs) prepared for cryopreservation. Methods: Magnetic resonance imaging was performed on room-temperature organs and VCAs perfused with IONPs and were assessed at 9.4 T. Quantitative T1 mapping and T* 2 -weighted images were acquired using sweep imaging with Fourier transformation and gradient-echo sequences, respectively. Verification of IONP localization was performed through histological assessment and microcomputer tomography. Results: Quantitative imaging was achieved for organs and VCAs perfused with up to 642 mMFe (36 mgFe/mL), which is above previous demonstrations of upper limit detection in agarose (35.7mMFe [2 mgFe/mL]). The stability of IONPs in the perfusate had an effect on the quality of distribution and imaging within organs or VCA. Finally, MRI provided more accurate IONP localization than Prussian blue histological staining in this system, wherein IONPs remain primarily in the vasculature. Conclusion: Using MRI, we were able to assess the distribution of IONPs throughout organs and VCAs varying in complexity. Additional studies are necessary to better understand this system and validate the calibration between T1 measurements and IONP concentration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1750-1759
Number of pages10
JournalMagnetic resonance in medicine
Volume83
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding information National Institutes of Health (P41 EB015894, R01 DK117425, and R01 HL135046); WM KECK Foundation;?U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command (W81XWH-16-1-0508 and W81XWH-16-C-0057); and 21st Century Medicine, Inc. This work was funded by National Institutes of Health (P41 EB015894, R01 DK117425, R01 HL 135046), WM KECK Foundation, and U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command (W81XWH-16-1-0508 and W81XWH-16-C-0057). The views, opinions, and findings contained in this report are those of the authors and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy, or decision unless so designated by other documentation. Research on rabbit kidneys was supported in part from institutional funding from 21st Century Medicine. Histologic services were provided by the Histology and Immunohistochemistry Laboratory, University of Minnesota. Histologic imaging was provided by the University of Minnesota Imaging Center. The authors thank C. Forster for her support with the histology, as well as N. Manuchehrabadi for his input during the onset of this project. We acknowledge John Phan and Victor Vargas for their assistance with rabbit kidney perfusion, and Simona Baicu for her contribution to ovary cannulation and perfusion procedures.

Funding Information:
This work was funded by National Institutes of Health (P41 EB015894, R01 DK117425, R01 HL 135046), WM KECK Foundation, and U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command (W81XWH‐16‐1‐0508 and W81XWH‐16‐C‐0057). The views, opinions, and findings contained in this report are those of the authors and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy, or decision unless so designated by other documentation. Research on rabbit kidneys was supported in part from institutional funding from 21st Century Medicine. Histologic services were provided by the Histology and Immunohistochemistry Laboratory, University of Minnesota. Histologic imaging was provided by the University of Minnesota Imaging Center. The authors thank C. Forster for her support with the histology, as well as N. Manuchehrabadi for his input during the onset of this project. We acknowledge John Phan and Victor Vargas for their assistance with rabbit kidney perfusion, and Simona Baicu for her contribution to ovary cannulation and perfusion procedures.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2019 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine

Keywords

  • and T2∗ quantitation
  • cryopreservation
  • iron oxide nanoparticle
  • MRI
  • nanowarming
  • organ preservation
  • SWIFT
  • T

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

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