Imaging the cardiac extracellular matrix

Michael A. Pinkert, Rebecca Hortensius, Brenda M Ogle, Kevin W. Eliceiri

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease is the global leading cause of death. One route to address this problem is using biomedical imaging to measure the molecules and structures that surround cardiac cells. This cellular microenvironment, known as the cardiac extracellular matrix, changes in composition and organization during most cardiac diseases and in response to many cardiac treatments. Measuring these changes with biomedical imaging can aid in understanding, diagnosing, and treating heart disease. This chapter supports those efforts by reviewing representative methods for imaging the cardiac extracellular matrix. It first describes the major biological targets of ECM imaging, including the primary imaging target of fibrillar collagen. Then it discusses the imaging methods, describing their current capabilities and limitations. It categorizes the imaging methods into two main categories: organ-scale noninvasive methods and cellular-scale invasive methods. Noninvasive methods can be used on patients, but only a few are clinically available, and others require further development to be used in the clinic. Invasive methods are the most established and can measure a variety of properties, but they cannot be used on live patients. Finally, the chapter concludes with a perspective on future directions and applications of biomedical imaging technologies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
PublisherSpringer New York LLC
Pages21-44
Number of pages24
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Publication series

NameAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume1098
ISSN (Print)0065-2598
ISSN (Electronic)2214-8019

Fingerprint

Extracellular Matrix
Imaging techniques
Heart Diseases
Fibrillar Collagens
Cellular Microenvironment
Biomedical Technology
Military electronic countermeasures
Cause of Death
Cardiovascular Diseases
Molecules
Chemical analysis

Keywords

  • Cardiac
  • Collagen
  • Composition
  • Extracellular matrix
  • Fibers
  • Imaging

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Review

Cite this

Pinkert, M. A., Hortensius, R., Ogle, B. M., & Eliceiri, K. W. (2018). Imaging the cardiac extracellular matrix. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology (pp. 21-44). (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1098). Springer New York LLC. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-97421-7_2

Imaging the cardiac extracellular matrix. / Pinkert, Michael A.; Hortensius, Rebecca; Ogle, Brenda M; Eliceiri, Kevin W.

Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC, 2018. p. 21-44 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology; Vol. 1098).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Pinkert, MA, Hortensius, R, Ogle, BM & Eliceiri, KW 2018, Imaging the cardiac extracellular matrix. in Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, vol. 1098, Springer New York LLC, pp. 21-44. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-97421-7_2
Pinkert MA, Hortensius R, Ogle BM, Eliceiri KW. Imaging the cardiac extracellular matrix. In Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC. 2018. p. 21-44. (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-97421-7_2
Pinkert, Michael A. ; Hortensius, Rebecca ; Ogle, Brenda M ; Eliceiri, Kevin W. / Imaging the cardiac extracellular matrix. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. Springer New York LLC, 2018. pp. 21-44 (Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology).
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