"I'm not one of them"

Barriers to help-seeking among American Indians with alcohol dependence

Kamilla L. Venner, Brenna L. Greenfield, Belinda Vicuña, Rosa Muñoz, S. Bhatt, Victoria O'Keefe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The majority of people with alcohol use disorders do not seek formal treatment. Research on barriers to help-seeking have only recently focused on ethnic minority populations. The present study investigated the extent to which an adult American Indian (AI) sample experienced similar and/or unique barriers to help-seeking as have been reported in the literature. Using both qualitative and quantitative methods, 56 (54% male) AIs with lifetime alcohol dependence completed a semistructured face-to-face interview and a self-administered written survey. Interviews were tape recorded, transcribed, and coded for four major themes: personal barriers, pragmatic barriers, concerns about seeking help, and social network barriers. Quantitative data provided percentage endorsing each survey item and strength of each barrier, which were categorized according to the four major themes. In previous research, most barriers questionnaires have not queried for cultural concerns or how the specific type of help may be a mismatch from the client's perspective. Given the rapidly changing racial/ethnic demography in the United States, further research addressing cultural and spiritual concerns as well as more common barriers is indicated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)352-362
Number of pages11
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2012

Fingerprint

North American Indians
American Indian
Alcoholism
alcohol
Research
Interviews
artificial intelligence
demography
interview
quantitative method
mismatch
Social Support
qualitative method
national minority
social network
pragmatics
Alcohols
Demography
questionnaire
Population

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • American Indian/Alaska Native
  • Barriers
  • Native American
  • Treatment

Cite this

"I'm not one of them" : Barriers to help-seeking among American Indians with alcohol dependence. / Venner, Kamilla L.; Greenfield, Brenna L.; Vicuña, Belinda; Muñoz, Rosa; Bhatt, S.; O'Keefe, Victoria.

In: Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, Vol. 18, No. 4, 01.10.2012, p. 352-362.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Venner, Kamilla L. ; Greenfield, Brenna L. ; Vicuña, Belinda ; Muñoz, Rosa ; Bhatt, S. ; O'Keefe, Victoria. / "I'm not one of them" : Barriers to help-seeking among American Indians with alcohol dependence. In: Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology. 2012 ; Vol. 18, No. 4. pp. 352-362.
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