"I'll never be in a relationship like that again"

Personal growth following romantic relationship breakups

Ty Tashiro, Patricia A Frazier

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study investigated the prevalence and correlates of personal growth and distress following romantic relationship breakups. Causal attributions for why the relationship declined and ended, personality factors, gender, and initiator status were examined as correlates of growth and distress in 92 undergraduates who had experienced a recent romantic relationship breakup. In regard to the prevalence of growth, respondents reported, on average, five types of personal growth they thought might improve their future romantic relationships. Correlates of self-reported growth included causal attributions to environmental factors and the personality factor of Agreeableness. Women reported more growth than did men. Factors related to higher levels of distress included causal attributions to the ex-partner and to environmental factors surrounding the previous relationship. The importance of assessing growth following relationship breakups and of accounting for the environmental context of close relationships is discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)113-128
Number of pages16
JournalPersonal Relationships
Volume10
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

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Growth
attribution
personality traits
Personality
environmental factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
gender

Cite this

"I'll never be in a relationship like that again" : Personal growth following romantic relationship breakups. / Tashiro, Ty; Frazier, Patricia A.

In: Personal Relationships, Vol. 10, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 113-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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