Identity and bond theories to understand design decisions for online communities

Yuqing Ren, Robert Kraut, Sara Kiesler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When we develop systems and policies for online communities, we make design decisions that may appeal to some members but discourage others. In this article, we examine online community design decisions in light of the common identity and common bond theories from social psychology. These theories posit two kinds of attachment to online groups - attachment to the group as a whole (group identity) and attachment to individual group members (member bonds). We review literature on the antecedents of group identity (social categorization, in-group interdependence, and out-group presence) and member bonds (social interaction, personal knowledge, and interpersonal similarity), and convergent and divergent consequences of the two types of attachment. We discuss implications of these antecedents and consequences for critical design tradeoffs, such as those associated with constraining or promoting off-topic discussion, requiring authentication or allowing anonymity, limiting group size or allowing uncontrolled growth, and structuring content or leaving it unstructured.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAcademy of Management 2006 Annual Meeting
Subtitle of host publicationKnowledge, Action and the Public Concern, AOM 2006
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Event66th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2006 - Atlanta, GA, United States
Duration: Aug 11 2006Aug 16 2006

Other

Other66th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2006
CountryUnited States
CityAtlanta, GA
Period8/11/068/16/06

Fingerprint

Authentication
Online communities
Group identity
Social interaction
Social categorization
Trade-offs
Group size
Anonymity
Outgroup
Social Psychology
Literature review
Interdependence

Keywords

  • Design
  • Group identity
  • Online communities

Cite this

Ren, Y., Kraut, R., & Kiesler, S. (2006). Identity and bond theories to understand design decisions for online communities. In Academy of Management 2006 Annual Meeting: Knowledge, Action and the Public Concern, AOM 2006

Identity and bond theories to understand design decisions for online communities. / Ren, Yuqing; Kraut, Robert; Kiesler, Sara.

Academy of Management 2006 Annual Meeting: Knowledge, Action and the Public Concern, AOM 2006. 2006.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ren, Y, Kraut, R & Kiesler, S 2006, Identity and bond theories to understand design decisions for online communities. in Academy of Management 2006 Annual Meeting: Knowledge, Action and the Public Concern, AOM 2006. 66th Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management, AOM 2006, Atlanta, GA, United States, 8/11/06.
Ren Y, Kraut R, Kiesler S. Identity and bond theories to understand design decisions for online communities. In Academy of Management 2006 Annual Meeting: Knowledge, Action and the Public Concern, AOM 2006. 2006
Ren, Yuqing ; Kraut, Robert ; Kiesler, Sara. / Identity and bond theories to understand design decisions for online communities. Academy of Management 2006 Annual Meeting: Knowledge, Action and the Public Concern, AOM 2006. 2006.
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