Identifying the spatiotemporal vulnerability of soils to antimicrobial contamination through land application of animal manure in Minnesota, United States

Irene Bueno Padilla, Antonio Rodríguez, Amanda L Beaudoin, William A. Arnold, Kristine H. Wammer, Ana de la Torre, Randall S. Singer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Antimicrobials may reach the soil environment from a variety of sources and pathways, including land application of human biosolids and animal manure. Once in soil, antimicrobials can affect the abundance and activity of soil microorganisms and exert selection pressures that enhance the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). To mitigate the spread of AMR it is important to understand the spatial and temporal interactions between antimicrobials and soil. The goal of this study was to assess the vulnerability of Minnesota (U.S.) soil to contamination with specific antimicrobial compounds at temperatures experienced throughout the year. Soil contamination potential was estimated based upon specific antimicrobial drug binding and permanence, and average monthly temperature. Minnesota soil vulnerability was estimated by incorporating spatially explicit soil contamination potential, land cover type, and livestock density. Assessment of antimicrobials used in livestock production showed that soils are most vulnerable to antimicrobial contamination in southwestern Minnesota, to enrofloxacin, chlortetracycline, and oxytetracycline, and in the months of April and October. While the assessment herein was not based on actual on-farm antimicrobial use data and subsequent excretion of antimicrobial metabolites into the environment, this study provides an overview of the spatial and temporal potential for Minnesota soil to be contaminated by several antimicrobial drugs and demonstrates how specific vulnerability assessments might be conducted for geographic areas with known exposure (e.g., cropland fertilized with livestock manure and/or human biosolids). Such assessments might be used to identify best practices for mitigating antimicrobial exposure to soils and guide additional research to understand the role of environmental antimicrobial contamination in the problem of AMR.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number155050
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume832
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Funding for this project was provided by the Minnesota Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund (M.L. 2018, Chp. 214, Art. 4, Sec. 02, Subd. 04h) as recommended by the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources (LCCMR). The funding source did not play any role in the study design, collection, analyses, interpretation, or writing of the report.

Funding Information:
Funding for this project was provided by the Minnesota Environment and Natural Resources Trust Fund (M.L. 2018, Chp. 214, Art. 4, Sec. 02, Subd. 04h) as recommended by the Legislative-Citizen Commission on Minnesota Resources (LCCMR). The funding source did not play any role in the study design, collection, analyses, interpretation, or writing of the report.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial
  • Biosolids
  • Manure
  • Minnesota
  • Soil
  • Spatial analysis

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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