Identifying populations useful for improving parents of a single cross based on net transfer of alleles

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Abstract

Theory and methods for identifying populations (Py) with the highest frequency of favorable dominant alleles not present in an elite single cross (I1× I2) have been developed recently. During selection, new favorable alleles can be transferred from Pyto either I1 or I2 only at the risk of losing favorable alleles already present in the single cross. A "net improvement" (NI) statistic, which estimates the relative number of favorable alleles that can be gained from Pyminus the relative number of favorable alleles that can be lost from I1 or I2, is presented. NI is calculated as maximum [(I1×Py-I1×I2)/2,(I2×Py-I1×I2)/2]. Because I1 × I2 is constant in an experiment, the method reduces to choosing Pypopulations with the best mean performance in combination with either I1 or I2. For a set of maize (Zea mays L.) grain yield data, NI was highly correlated to three other statistics proposed for choosing populations, namely: (1) minimally biased estimate (l {Mathematical expression}μ′) of the relative number of favorable dominant alleles present in Pybut not in I1 and I2; (2) minimum upper bound on l {Mathematical expression}μ; and (3) predicted performance of the three-way cross [Py(I1× I2)]. While l {Mathematical expression}μ′ estimates potential improvement likely to be achieved only through long-term recurrent selection, NI is probably a better predictor of short-term improvement in single-cross performance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)349-352
Number of pages4
JournalTheoretical and Applied Genetics
Volume80
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 1990

Keywords

  • Favorable alleles
  • Populations
  • Zea mays L

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