Identifying Perspectives About Health to Orient Obesity Intervention Among Urban, Transitionally Housed Indigenous Children

Derek R. Jennings, Koushik Paul, Meg M. Little, Daryl Olson, Michelle D. Johnson-Jennings

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Drawing from a socioecological framework of health, this community-based participatory research study examined key cultural health perspectives of transitionally housed, food insecure Indigenous children (aged 8–12 years) by utilizing talking circles and a 4-day photovoice (PV) curriculum. In total, 18 Indigenous children portrayed their health perceptions by taking photographs of their living environment and categorizing photos as healthy, unhealthy, or mixed. And, 10 of the 18 children completed pre- and post-evaluations, where data elucidated that urban Indigenous children experiencing food and housing insecurity demonstrate unique holistic and socioecological perceptions about health. Healthy themes included nutrition, gardening, interpersonal relationships, food sovereignty, water quality, and natural and built environments. Unhealthy themes included cumulative stress, food insecurity, access and cost, screen time, smoking, and violence. We found that implementing these robust insights into urban Indigenous obesity prevention interventions could significantly drive success. This approach may benefit children with similar socioecological strengths and vulnerabilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)894-905
Number of pages12
JournalQualitative Health Research
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2020

Keywords

  • food insecurity
  • food sovereignty
  • health beliefs
  • Indigenous health
  • photovoice
  • place based healing
  • qualitative
  • upper midwest US

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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