I'd rather be rude than ruled: Gender, place and communal politics among south Asian communities in Dar es Salaam

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Abstract

This article revolves around the stories of four South Asian women in Dares Salaam (Tanzania), all of whom chose to be "rude rather than ruled" by their communities, and selected public places such as temples, community halls, and beaches as arenas for their struggles. The author uses these stories to illustrate how a historically-informed focus on gendered acts of resistance in everyday places can yield crucial insights about the complex workings of power and difference in postcolonial contexts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)571-585
Number of pages15
JournalWomen's Studies International Forum
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2000

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was funded by grants from the National Science Foundation (SES-9205409), and from the Department of Geography, the MacArthur Program, and the Graduate School at the University of Minnesota. I am indebted to all the members of the Hindu and Ithna Asheri communities in Dar es Salaam who warmly and trustfully shared their stories and experiences with me. Many thanks to Maryse Curie and Sharilyn Geistfeld for their assistance with library research, and to Susan Geiger, Sharilyn Geistfeld, the members of Comparative Women's History Workshop at Minnesota, and two anonymous reviewers for their insightful comments and suggestions. Last but not least, I am grateful to David Faust for his extremely helpful feedback on several versions of this article.

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