I think I can, I think I can

Brand use, self-efficacy, and performance

Ji Kyung Park, Deborah R John

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

When consumers struggle with a difficult task, using a brand can help them perform better. The authors report four studies showing that brand use can enhance feelings of self-efficacy, which can lead to better task performance. Students scored higher on difficult Graduate Records Examination questions when they took the test using a Massachusetts Institute of Technology pen (Study 1) and showed better athletic performance when they drank water from a Gatorade cup during strenuous athletic exercise (Studies 2 and 3). These increases in task performance were mediated by feelings of self-efficacy (Studies 3 and 4). Furthermore, the results show that not everyone experiences the beneficial effect of brand use; it depends on the person's implicit self-theory. Across studies, users adopting entity theories ("entity theorists") showed increased self-efficacy and better task performance, whereas users adopting incremental theories ("incremental theorists") were unaffected by brand use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)233-247
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Marketing Research
Volume51
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Self-efficacy
Task performance
Athletics
Incremental
Exercise
Drinks
Water
User studies

Keywords

  • Brands
  • Implicit self-theories
  • Self-efficacy

Cite this

I think I can, I think I can : Brand use, self-efficacy, and performance. / Park, Ji Kyung; John, Deborah R.

In: Journal of Marketing Research, Vol. 51, No. 2, 01.01.2014, p. 233-247.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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