I do not believe you: how providing a source corrects health misperceptions across social media platforms

Emily K. Vraga, Leticia Bode

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

Social media are often criticized as serving as a source of misinformation, but in this study we examine how they may also function to correct misperceptions on an emerging health issue. We use an experimental design to consider social correction that occurs via peers, testing both the type of correction (i.e., whether a source is provided or not) and the platform on which the correction ocratcurs (i.e., Facebook versus Twitter). Our results suggest that a source is necessary to correct misperceptions about the causes of the Zika virus on both Facebook and Twitter, but the mechanism by which such correction occurs differs across platforms. Implications for successful social media campaigns to address health misinformation are addressed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1337-1353
Number of pages17
JournalInformation Communication and Society
Volume21
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 3 2018

Keywords

  • Facebook
  • health
  • Misinformation
  • social media
  • Twitter

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