"I Beat Cancer to Feel Sick:" Qualitative Experiences of Sleep Disturbance in Black Breast Cancer Survivors and Recommendations for Culturally Targeted Sleep Interventions

Carley Geiss, Melody N. Chavez, Laura B. Oswald, Dana Ketcher, Maija Reblin, Elisa V. Bandera, Josée Savard, Eric S. Zhou, Rina S. Fox, Heather S.L. Jim, Brian D. Gonzalez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Sleep disturbance is common and distressing among cancer survivors. Black breast cancer survivors (BBCS) suffer disproportionately from sleep disturbance, yet there is limited research on how to address this issue. PURPOSE: This study aimed to understand the multifaceted experiences of sleep disturbance among BBCS and how to culturally target a mobile health (mHealth) intervention to improve sleep outcomes in BBCS. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted in a purposive sample of 10 BBCS. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for key barriers to sleep and potential solutions to incorporate into behavioral interventions using NVivo 12. Inductive applied thematic analysis techniques were employed to identify emergent themes. RESULTS: Ten BBCS (mean age = 54, SD = 10) described their experiences of sleep disturbance with themes including: (1) barriers to quality sleep (e.g., cancer worry, personal responsibilities), (2) psychosocial impacts of sleep disturbance (e.g., fatigue, distress), and (3) commonly used strategies to improve sleep. The second section discusses suggestions for developing mHealth interventions to improve sleep for BBCS including: (1) feedback on an existing mHealth intervention and (2) intervention topics suggested by BBCS. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the challenges associated with sleep disturbance in BBCS. Participants report culturally targeted mHealth interventions are needed for BBCS who experience chronic sleep disturbance that affects their overall quality of life. These interventions should address coping with sleep-related issues relevant to many breast cancer survivors and BBCS (e.g., sexual intimacy, fear of cancer recurrence) and should incorporate intervention strategies acceptable to BBCS (e.g., prayer, meditation).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1110-1115
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of behavioral medicine : a publication of the Society of Behavioral Medicine
Volume56
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 Society of Behavioral Medicine. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Black or African American cancer survivors
  • Cancer
  • mobile health (mHealth)
  • Oncology
  • Patient-Reported Outcomes
  • Quality of life
  • Sleep
  • Survivorship

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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