Hybridization underlies localized trait evolution in cavefish

Rachel L. Moran, James B. Jaggard, Emma Y. Roback, Alexander Kenzior, Nicolas Rohner, Johanna E. Kowalko, Claudia Patricia Ornelas-García, Suzanne E. McGaugh, Alex C. Keene

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Introgressive hybridization may play an integral role in local adaptation and speciation (Taylor and Larson, 2019). In the Mexican tetra Astyanax mexicanus, cave populations have repeatedly evolved traits including eye loss, sleep loss, and albinism. Of the 30 caves inhabited by A. mexicanus, Chica cave is unique because it contains multiple pools inhabited by putative hybrids between surface and cave populations (Mitchell et al., 1977), providing an opportunity to investigate the impact of hybridization on complex trait evolution. We show that hybridization between cave and surface populations may contribute to localized variation in traits associated with cave evolution, including pigmentation, eye development, and sleep. We also uncover an example of convergent evolution in a circadian clock gene in multiple cavefish lineages and burrowing mammals, suggesting a shared genetic mechanism underlying circadian disruption in subterranean vertebrates. Our results provide insight into the role of hybridization in facilitating phenotypic evolution.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number103778
JournaliScience
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 18 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We thank two anonymous reviewers for their comments and feedback which have greatly improved this manuscript. We thank the University of Minnesota Genomics Center for their guidance and for performing the library preparations and sequencing. The Minnesota Supercomputing Institute (MSI) at the University of Minnesota provided resources that contributed to the research results reported within this article. Funding was supported by NIH 1R01GM127872-01 to SEM, ACK, and NR, NSF award IOS-165674 to ACK, a US-Israel BSF award to ACK, NSF award DEB-2147597 to JK and ACK, NSF awards IOS-1933076 and IOS-2202359 to JK, SEM, and NR, and NIH NHLBI sleep training grant T32HL007713-28 to JBJ. Fish were collected under CONAPESCA permit SGPA/DGVS/266/15 to Claudia Patricia Ornelas García.

Funding Information:
We thank two anonymous reviewers for their comments and feedback which have greatly improved this manuscript. We thank the University of Minnesota Genomics Center for their guidance and for performing the library preparations and sequencing. The Minnesota Supercomputing Institute (MSI) at the University of Minnesota provided resources that contributed to the research results reported within this article. Funding was supported by NIH 1R01GM127872-01 to SEM, ACK, and NR, NSF award IOS-165674 to ACK, a US-Israel BSF award to ACK, NSF award DEB-2147597 to JK and ACK, NSF awards IOS-1933076 and IOS-2202359 to JK, SEM, and NR, and NIH NHLBI sleep training grant T32HL007713-28 to JBJ. Fish were collected under CONAPESCA permit SGPA/DGVS/266/15 to Claudia Patricia Ornelas Garc?a. Conceptualization, S.E.M. and A.C.K.; investigation and analysis, R.L.M. J.B.J. E.Y.R. A.K. N.R. J.E.K. P.O.-G. S.E.M. and A.C.K.; visualization, R.L.M. J.B.J. E.Y.R.; writing - original draft, R.L.M. writing - review and editing, R.L.M. J.B.J. E.Y.R. A.K. N.R. J.E.K. P.O.-G. S.E.M. and A.C.K. The authors declare no competing interests.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022

Keywords

  • Aquatic biology
  • Aquatic science
  • Evolutionary biology

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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