Human papillomavirus vaccine and Pap tests on college campuses: How do historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) measure up?

Kierra S. Barnett, Abigail B. Shoben, Annie Laurie McRee, Paul L. Reiter, Electra D. Paskett, Mira L. Katz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The availability of cervical cancer prevention services at college health centers was compared between historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) and non-HBCUs. Methods: Four-year, non–primarily distant learning colleges, matching HBCUs with randomly selected non-HBCUs within the same states (N = 136) were examined. Data were collected (2014–2015 academic year) on the availability of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine and Pap tests at college health centers. HBCUs were compared with non-HBCUs using conditional logistic regression, and correlates of offering these services were identified. Results: Many institutions did not offer HPV vaccine or Pap tests. Fewer HBCUs offered HPV vaccine (18% vs 53%) and Pap tests (50% vs 76%) compared with non-HBCUs. In multivariable analyses, HBCUs remained less likely than non-HBCUs to offer HPV vaccine (odds ratio [OR] = 0.07, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.02–0.26) and Pap tests (OR = 0.19, 95% CI: 0.06–0.61). Conclusions: Greater effort is needed to make cervical cancer prevention services available at colleges, especially at HBCUs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)613-618
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of American College Health
Volume64
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 16 2016

Keywords

  • Cervical cancer
  • human papillomavirus
  • papanicolaou test

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