Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody Testing: A Description of Practices and Policies at US Infectious Disease—Teaching Hospitals and Minnesota Hospitals

William K Henry, Karen Willenbring, Kent B Crossley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

A questionnaire that asked about policies concerning the use of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antibody tests was sent in January 1987 to the 200 hospitals in the United States that conduct infectious disease (ID) fellowship training (US ID hospitals) and to all 171 short-term—care Minnesota hospitals. Information was received from 189 of the US ID hospitals (94.5%) and from 160 (94%) of the Minnesota hospitals. Only 49% of the US ID hospitals and 37% of the Minnesota hospitals had an HIV antibody test—ordering policy; 47% of the US ID hospitals and 39% of the Minnesota hospitals had a specific educational program for physicians about the HIV antibody test; and 62% of the US ID hospitals and 41% of the Minnesota hospitals had an HIV autopsy policy. Marked variety existed in approaches to handling test results, obtaining patient consent, and providing risk-reduction information among the hospitals surveyed. These data suggest the need for a consensus on optimal use of HIV antibody testing at hospitals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1819-1822
Number of pages4
JournalJAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume259
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 25 1988

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