Human capital, gender, and labor force incorporation: The case of immigrants from the Former Soviet Union

John R. Logan, Julia A Drew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Women immigrating to the United States from the Former Soviet Union (FSU) were expected to incorporate seamlessly into the US labor force because of their strong educational and professional backgrounds. Using 2000 Census data, we find that FSU women were less successful than both FSU men and other non-Hispanic white female immigrants. After controlling for other factors, FSU women were more likely to rely on public assistance and less likely to be employed. If employed, they worked in less prestigious occupations and earned much less.These findings draw attention to the particular difficulties of incorporation of this wave of relatively advantaged immigrants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-44
Number of pages20
JournalInternational Journal of Comparative Sociology
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Former Soviet Union
  • gender
  • immigrants
  • labor force incorporation
  • public assistance
  • refugees

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Human capital, gender, and labor force incorporation: The case of immigrants from the Former Soviet Union'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this