How well does patient self-report predict asthma medication possession implications for medication reconciliation and adherence assessment

Kaiser G. Lim, Matthew A. Rank, James T.C. Li, Ashok Patel, Gerald W. Volcheck, Megan E. Branda, Rosa Cabanela, James M. Naessens, Nilay D. Shah, Amy Wagie, Timothy Beebe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background. Self-report is the most commonly used method for collecting information regarding asthma medication possession and adherence in clinical practice. Objective. To determine the agreement between self-report and pharmacy claims data for asthma medication possession. Methods. This is a retrospective study that examined pharmacy claims data 12 months before and after participants completed a structured asthma survey. This study was performed in a sample of health care workers and dependents >17 years old in a large, self-insured Midwestern United States health care center. The main outcome measure was agreement (kappa calculation) between self-report and pharmacy claims data of asthma medication possession. Results. Self-report of asthma medication use agreed moderately with pharmacy claims data for short-acting albuterol (κ=;0.47 ± 0.03), salmeterol (κ=0.79 ± 0.04), and montelukast (κ=0.69 ± 0.03) but only slightly for inhaled corticosteroids (κ=0.18 ± 0.03) and prednisone (κ=0.10 ± 0.03) (n1050 respondents). Both under self-reporting and over self-reporting were common with inhaled corticosteroids (14.4 and 23.1, respectively) and varied significantly by specific drug type. Conclusions. Self-report moderately agrees with asthma medication possession for most adult asthma patients, though the agreement differs considerably between and within asthma medication classes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)878-882
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Asthma
Volume47
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2010

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Asthma education
  • Inhaled corticosteroids
  • Medication adherence
  • Medication possession
  • Medication reconciliation
  • Self-report
  • Short-acting bronchodilators

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