How roots perceive and respond to gravity.

R. Moore, M. L. Evans

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Graviperception by plant roots is believed to occur via the sedimentation of amyloplasts in columella cells of the root cap. This physical stimulus results in an accumulation of calcium on the lower side of the cap, which in turn induces gravicurvature. In this paper we present a model for root gravitropism integrating gravity-induced changes in electrical potential, cytochemical localization of calcium in cells of gravistimulated roots, and the interdependence of calcium and auxin movement. Key features of the model are that 1) gravity-induced redistribution of calcium is an early event in the transduction mechanism, and 2) apoplastic movement of calcium through the root-cap mucilage may be an important component of the pathway for calcium movement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)574-587
Number of pages14
JournalAmerican Journal of Botany
Volume73
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1986

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Gravitation
gravity
calcium
Calcium
root cap
Gravitropism
mucilage
amyloplasts
gravitropism
Plant Roots
Indoleacetic Acids
Plastids
mucilages
auxins
sedimentation
cells

Cite this

How roots perceive and respond to gravity. / Moore, R.; Evans, M. L.

In: American Journal of Botany, Vol. 73, No. 4, 01.01.1986, p. 574-587.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Moore, R. ; Evans, M. L. / How roots perceive and respond to gravity. In: American Journal of Botany. 1986 ; Vol. 73, No. 4. pp. 574-587.
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