How prepared are your interns to take calls? Results of a multi-institutional study of simulated pages to prepare medical students for surgery internship

Adam C. Frischknecht, Margaret L. Boehler, Cathy J. Schwind, Melissa E Brunsvold, Larry D. Gruppen, Michael J. Brenner, Linnea S. Hauge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background This study evaluated a simulated pages curriculum that was developed to assess communication and clinical decision making in medical students and interns. Methods A curriculum consisting of 14 simulated pages was administered across 5 institutions to 150 senior medical students. A 3-case subset was administered to interns who did not participate in the curriculum. Six expert surgeons identified critical fails and set passing scores for case-specific assessments using the Graphical Hofstee Method. Results Participants in the curriculum demonstrated superior clinical decision making compared with non-participants across all cases scenarios (P <.01). Average medical student scores for clinical decision making were 46.9%. Global ratings averaged 6.0 for communication and 5.2 for patient care. Passing rates averaged 46%. Conclusions Participation in a mock page curriculum improved performance. The performance of participants based on expert standards set for simulated page performance highlight the need for innovative approaches to improve interns' preparedness to take calls.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)307-315
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican journal of surgery
Volume208
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2014

Keywords

  • Interdisciplinary communication
  • Residency training
  • Simulation
  • Surgical education

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