How Korean and White Americans Evaluate and Use Online Advertising and Non-advertising Sources for Prescription Drug Information

Jisu Huh, Denise E. DeLorme, Leonard N. Reid, Junga Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined Korean Americans' evaluation and use of online advertising and non-advertising sources of prescription drug information and compared the findings to those of white Americans. A mail survey was conducted with a disproportionate stratified sample of 600 adults (300 general population and 300 Korean Americans) who have ever taken or are currently taking prescription drugs regularly and reside in a metropolitan area in the Midwestern United States. While both Korean and white Americans evaluated online non-advertising sources more positively than advertising sources, the 2 groups were similar in their evaluation of both online advertising and non-advertising sources. White Americans tended to use more online advertising sources than did Korean Americans, but both groups were equally likely to use non-advertising sources. Evaluation and use of online advertising and non-advertising sources by Korean and white Americans were associated with different predictors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)116-124
Number of pages9
JournalTherapeutic Innovation and Regulatory Science
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was funded by a grant from the American Academy of Advertising.

Keywords

  • advertising sources
  • consumer responses
  • non-advertising sources
  • online information
  • prescription drugs

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'How Korean and White Americans Evaluate and Use Online Advertising and Non-advertising Sources for Prescription Drug Information'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this