How is the practice of yoga related to weight status? Population-based findings from project EAT-IV

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Abstract

Background: Yoga may provide a strategy for healthy weightmanagement in young adults. This study examined prevalence and characteristics of young adults' yoga practice and associations with changes in body mass index. Methods: Surveys were completed by 1830 young adults (31.1 ± 1.6 y) participating in Project EAT-IV. Cross-sectional and 5-year longitudinal analyses were conducted stratified by initial weight status. Results: Two-thirds (66.5%) of nonoverweight women and 48.9% of overweight women reported ever doing yoga, while 27.2% of nonoverweight women and 16.4% of overweight women practiced regularly (≥30 min/wk). Fewer men practiced yoga. Among young adults practicing regularly (n = 294), differences were identified in intensity, type, and location of yoga practice across weight status. Young adults who were overweight and practiced yoga regularly showed a nonsignificant 5-year decrease in their body mass index (-0.60 kg/m2; P = .49), whereas those not practicing regularly had significant increases in their body mass index (+1.37 kg/m2; P > .01). Frequency of yoga was inversely associated with weight gain among both overweight and nonoverweight young adults practicing yoga regularly. Conclusions: Young adults of different body sizes practice yoga. Yoga was associated with less weight gain over time, particularly in overweight young adults. Practicing yoga on a regular basis may help with weight gain prevention.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)905-912
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Physical Activity and Health
Volume14
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Yoga
Weights and Measures
Young Adult
Population
Weight Gain
Body Mass Index
Body Size
Cross-Sectional Studies

Keywords

  • Body weight
  • Epidemiology
  • Intervention study
  • Obesity
  • Youth

Cite this

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title = "How is the practice of yoga related to weight status? Population-based findings from project EAT-IV",
abstract = "Background: Yoga may provide a strategy for healthy weightmanagement in young adults. This study examined prevalence and characteristics of young adults' yoga practice and associations with changes in body mass index. Methods: Surveys were completed by 1830 young adults (31.1 ± 1.6 y) participating in Project EAT-IV. Cross-sectional and 5-year longitudinal analyses were conducted stratified by initial weight status. Results: Two-thirds (66.5{\%}) of nonoverweight women and 48.9{\%} of overweight women reported ever doing yoga, while 27.2{\%} of nonoverweight women and 16.4{\%} of overweight women practiced regularly (≥30 min/wk). Fewer men practiced yoga. Among young adults practicing regularly (n = 294), differences were identified in intensity, type, and location of yoga practice across weight status. Young adults who were overweight and practiced yoga regularly showed a nonsignificant 5-year decrease in their body mass index (-0.60 kg/m2; P = .49), whereas those not practicing regularly had significant increases in their body mass index (+1.37 kg/m2; P > .01). Frequency of yoga was inversely associated with weight gain among both overweight and nonoverweight young adults practicing yoga regularly. Conclusions: Young adults of different body sizes practice yoga. Yoga was associated with less weight gain over time, particularly in overweight young adults. Practicing yoga on a regular basis may help with weight gain prevention.",
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author = "Neumark-Sztainer, {Dianne R} and Maclehose, {Richard F} and Watts, {Allison W.} and Eisenberg, {Marla E} and Laska, {Melissa N} and Larson, {Nicole I}",
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AU - Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne R

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AU - Eisenberg, Marla E

AU - Laska, Melissa N

AU - Larson, Nicole I

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