How Frequent Financial Reporting Can Cause Managerial Short-Termism: An Analysis of the Costs and Benefits of Increasing Reporting Frequency

Frank Gigler, Chandra Kanodia, Haresh Sapra, Raghu Venugopalan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

51 Scopus citations

Abstract

We develop a cost-benefit tradeoff that provides new insights into the frequency with which firms should be required to report the results of their operations to the capital market. The benefit to increasing the frequency of financial reporting is that it causes market prices to better deter investments in negative net present value projects. The cost of increased frequency is that it increases the probability of inducing managerial short-termism. We analyze the tradeoff between these costs and benefits and develop conditions under which greater reporting frequency is desirable and conditions under which it is not.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)357-387
Number of pages31
JournalJournal of Accounting Research
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2014

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