How does the implementation of enterprise information systems affect a professional's mobility? An empirical study

Brad N. Greenwood, Kartik K. Ganju, Corey M. Angst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although significant research has examined the effect of enterprise information systems on the behavior and careers of employees, the majority of this work has been devoted to the study of blue- and gray-collar workers, with little attention paid to the transformative effect information technology may have on high-status professionals. In this paper, we begin to bridge this gap by examining how highly skilled professionals react to the increasing presence of enterprise systems within their organizations. Specifically, we investigate how the implementation of enterprise systems-in the form of electronic health records-affects the decision of physicians to continue practicing at their current hospital. Results suggest that when enterprise systems create complementarities for professionals, their duration of practice at the organization increases significantly. However, when technologies are disruptive and force professionals to alter their routines, there is a pronounced exodus from the organization. Interestingly, these effects are strongly moderated by individual and organizational characteristics, such as the degree of firm-specific human capital, local competition, and the prevalence of past disruptions, but are not associated with accelerated retirement or the strategic poaching of talent by competing organizations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)563-594
Number of pages32
JournalInformation Systems Research
Volume30
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2019

Keywords

  • Electronic health records
  • Enterprise systems
  • Logit hazard model
  • Physicians
  • Professional mobility
  • Technology adoption

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'How does the implementation of enterprise information systems affect a professional's mobility? An empirical study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this