How do individuals adapt their personal travel? Objective and subjective influences on the consideration of travel-related strategies for San Francisco Bay Area commuters

Xinyu Cao, Patricia L. Mokhtarian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

64 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study operationalizes the conceptual analysis presented in a companion paper, to examine the effects of objective and subjective variables on the consideration of 16 travel-related strategies reflecting a range of individuals' potential reactions to congestion. Using 1283 commuting respondents to a 1998 survey conducted in the San Francisco Bay Area, binary logit models were developed for the consideration of each individual strategy. The proportion of information explained by these models ranges from 0.18 to 0.63. It was found that the consideration of travel-related strategies is affected not only by the amounts of travel that individuals actually do, but also by their subjective assessments, desires and affinities with respect to travel, as well as their travel attitudes, personality and lifestyle. The previous adoption of these strategies greatly affects their current consideration, demonstrating an effect of past experience. Mobility constraints and socio-economic and demographic characteristics exhibit distributional effects with respect to the options individuals consider. These findings imply that policies designed to alleviate congestion may be less effective than expected, because individuals' responses to the travel-related strategies analyzed here - Many of them directly tied to public policies intended to reduce vehicle travel - Are influenced by a large variety of qualitative and experiential variables that are seldom measured and incorporated into demand models. Therefore, understanding the role of such variables will improve our ability to design effective policies and to accurately forecast the response to policy interventions as well as natural trends.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)291-302
Number of pages12
JournalTransport Policy
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2005
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
M.A.K. is funded by an NIHR Research Professorship and receives funding from the Sir Jules Thorn Award for Biomedical Research, Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital Charity (GOSHCC) and Rosetrees Trust. M.A.K., K.E.B., L.A., D.S., A.N., N.T. and E.M. are supported by the NIHR GOSH BRC. K.M.G. received funding from Temple Street Foundation. L.A. is funded by the Swiss National Foundation. E.M. received funding from the Rosetrees Trust (CD-A53), and the Great Ormond Street Hospital Children’s Charity. A.S.J. is funded by NIHR Bioresource for Rare Diseases. S.A.I. and M.H. are supported by the NINDS Intramural program. K.P.B. is PI of the Movement disorders centre (MDC) at UCL, Institute of Neurology which has been funded by the BRC. He has grant support by EU Horizon 2020. M.E.D-H. has clinical training grant through Tourette Association of America, but the research is unrelated to KMT2B. T.L. received funding from Health Research Board, Ireland and Michael J Fox. Foundation. K.A.M. receives funding from the NIH (award number K23NS101096-01A1). N.S. receives funding from the NIH (award number NS 087997 0). D.D. was supported by KIM MUSE Biomarkers and Therapy study grant during this work. B.B.A.d.V. financially supported by grants from the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (912-12-109). J.F. is funded by the Rady Children’s Institute for Genomic Medicine. F.L.R. is funded by Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre. The DDD study presents independent research commissioned by the Health Innovation Challenge Fund [grant number HICF-1009-003], a parallel funding partnership between the Wellcome Trust and the Department of Health, and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute [grant number WT098051]. This research

Funding Information:
We thank all our patients and their families for taking part in this study. This research was supported by the NIHR Great Ormond Street Hospital Biomedical Research Centre. We also acknowledge support from the UK Department of Health via the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre award to Guy’s and St. Thomas’ National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust in partnership with King’s College London. The research team acknowledges the support of the National Institute for Health Research, through the Comprehensive Clinical Research Network. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, Department of Health or Wellcome Trust. Sequencing for Patient 37 was provided by the University of Washington Center for Mendelian Genomics (UW-CMG) and was funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute grant HG006493 to Drs Debbie Nickerson, Michael Bamshad, and Suzanne Leal.

Funding Information:
We thank all our patients and their families for taking part in this study. This research was supported by the NIHR Great Ormond Street Hospital Biomedical Research Centre. We also acknowledge support from the UK Department of Health via the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre award to Guy's and St. Thomas' National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust in partnership with King's College London. The research team acknowledges the support of the National Institute for Health Research, through the Comprehensive Clinical Research Network. The views expressed are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, Department of Health or Wellcome Trust. Sequencing for Patient 37 was provided by the University of Washington Center for Mendelian Genomics (UW-CMG) and was funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute grant HG006493 to Drs Debbie Nickerson, Michael Bamshad, and Suzanne Leal. M.A.K. is funded by an NIHR Research Professorship and receives funding from the Sir Jules Thorn Award for Biomedical Research, Great Ormond Street Children's Hospital Charity (GOSHCC) and Rosetrees Trust. M.A.K., K.E.B., L.A., D.S., A.N., N.T. and E.M. are supported by the NIHR GOSH BRC. K.M.G. received funding from Temple Street Foundation. L.A. is funded by the Swiss National Foundation. E.M. received funding from the Rosetrees Trust (CD-A53), and the Great Ormond Street Hospital Children's Charity. A.S.J. is funded by NIHR Bioresource for Rare Diseases. S.A.I. and M.H. are supported by the NINDS Intramural program. K.P.B. is PI of the Movement disorders centre (MDC) at UCL, Institute of Neurology which has been funded by the BRC. He has grant support by EU Horizon 2020. M.E.D-H. has clinical training grant through Tourette Association of America, but the research is unrelated to KMT2B. T.L. received funding from Health Research Board, Ireland and Michael J Fox. Foundation. K.A.M. receives funding from the NIH (award number K23NS101096-01A1). N.S. receives funding from the NIH (award number NS 087997 0). D.D. was supported by KIM MUSE Biomarkers and Therapy study grant during this work. B.B.A.d.V. financially supported by grants from the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (912-12-109). J.F. is funded by the Rady Children's Institute for Genomic Medicine. F.L.R. is funded by Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre. The DDD study presents independent research commissioned by the Health Innovation Challenge Fund [grant number HICF-1009-003], a parallel funding partnership between the Wellcome Trust and the Department of Health, and the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute [grant number WT098051]. This research was made possible through access to the data and findings generated by the 100 000 Genomes Project (Patient 34). The 100 000 Genomes Project is managed by Genomics England Limited (a wholly owned company of the Department of Health). The 100 000 Genomes Project is funded by the National Institute for Health Research and NHS England. The Wellcome Trust, Cancer Research UK and the Medical Research Council have also funded research infrastructure. The 100 000 Genomes Project uses data provided by patients and collected by the National Health Service as part of their care and support. Research reported in this manuscript was supported by the NIH Common Fund, through the Office of Strategic Coordination/Office of the NIH Director to the Undiagnosed Disease Network (UDN) and the NIH Undiagnosed Disease Program (Award numbers: U01HG007690 and U01HG007703). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Funding Information:
was made possible through access to the data and findings generated by the 100 000 Genomes Project (Patient 34). The 100 000 Genomes Project is managed by Genomics England Limited (a wholly owned company of the Department of Health). The 100 000 Genomes Project is funded by the National Institute for Health Research and NHS England. The Wellcome Trust, Cancer Research UK and the Medical Research Council have also funded research infrastructure. The 100 000 Genomes Project uses data provided by patients and collected by the National Health Service as part of their care and support. Research reported in this manuscript was supported by the NIH Common Fund, through the Office of Strategic Coordination/Office of the NIH Director to the Undiagnosed Disease Network (UDN) and the NIH Undiagnosed Disease Program (Award numbers: U01HG007690 and U01HG007703). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Choice set
  • Logit model
  • Transportation demand management
  • Travel behavior

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