How do beliefs about different human papillomavirus-related diseases vary among young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men in the United States?

Paul L. Reiter, Amy L. Gower, Abigail B. Shoben, Annie Laurie McRee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To determine how beliefs about various disease outcomes caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection differ among young gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (YGBMSM). Methods: From 2019 to 2021, we recruited cisgender YGBMSM ages 18–25 in the United States who were unvaccinated against HPV (n = 1,227). Survey items examined three disease outcomes (genital warts, anal cancer, and oropharyngeal cancer) for each of three different beliefs (perceived vulnerability, perceived severity, and worry) Results: Participants reported lower perceived vulnerability to and worry about anal cancer and oropharyngeal cancer compared to genital warts (all p < 0.001). Participants also reported greater perceived severity of anal cancer and oropharyngeal cancer compared to genital warts (all p < 0.001). Some patterns of beliefs differed by participant characteristics. Conclusions: The beliefs of YGBMSM varied by HPV-related disease outcome. Findings can guide future HPV vaccination communication efforts for YGBMSM by informing how to better frame messages and increase relevance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102780
JournalPreventive Medicine Reports
Volume43
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 The Authors

Keywords

  • Bisexual
  • Gay
  • Human papillomavirus
  • MSM
  • Young adult

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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