How can basic research on spatial cognition enhance the visual accessibility of architecture for people with low vision?

Sarah H. Creem-Regehr, Erica M. Barhorst-Cates, Margaret R. Tarampi, Kristina M. Rand, Gordon E. Legge

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

People with visual impairment often rely on their residual vision when interacting with their spatial environments. The goal of visual accessibility is to design spaces that allow for safe travel for the large and growing population of people who have uncorrectable vision loss, enabling full participation in modern society. This paper defines the functional challenges in perception and spatial cognition with restricted visual information and reviews a body of empirical work on low vision perception of spaces on both local and global navigational scales. We evaluate how the results of this work can provide insights into the complex problem that architects face in the design of visually accessible spaces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3
JournalCognitive Research: Principles and Implications
Volume6
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 7 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by the National Eye Institute of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number R01EY017835. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020, The Author(s).

Keywords

  • Design
  • Low vision
  • Space perception
  • Spatial cognition

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