How Accurate are Recalls of Self-Weighing Frequency? Data from a 24-Month Randomized Trial

Melissa M. Crane, Kara Gavin, Julian Wolfson, Jennifer A. Linde

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Self-weighing is an important component of self-monitoring during weight loss. However, methods of measuring self-weighing frequency need to be validated. This analysis compared self-reported and objective weighing frequency. Methods: Data came from a 24-month randomized controlled trial. Participants received 12 months of a behavioral weight-loss program and were randomly assigned to (1) daily self-weighing, (2) weekly weighing, or (3) no weighing (excluded from analysis). Objective weighing frequency was measured by Wi-Fi enabled scales, and self-reported weighing frequency was assessed every 6 months by questionnaire. Objective weights were categorized to match the scale of the self-report measure. Results: At 12 months, there was 80.8% agreement between self-reported and objective weighing frequency (weighted kappa = 0.67; P < 0.001). At 24 months, agreement decreased to 48.5% (kappa = 0.27; P < 0.001). At both time points in which disagreements occurred, self-reported frequencies were generally greater than objectively assessed weighing. Both self-reported and objectively assessed weighing frequency was associated with weight loss at 12 and 24 months (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Self-reported weighing frequency is modestly correlated with objective weighing frequency; however, both are associated with weight change over time. Objective assessment of weighing frequency should be used to avoid overestimating actual frequency.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1296-1302
Number of pages7
JournalObesity
Volume26
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2018

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Weight Loss
Weight Reduction Programs
Weights and Measures
Self Report
Randomized Controlled Trials
Surveys and Questionnaires

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How Accurate are Recalls of Self-Weighing Frequency? Data from a 24-Month Randomized Trial. / Crane, Melissa M.; Gavin, Kara; Wolfson, Julian; Linde, Jennifer A.

In: Obesity, Vol. 26, No. 8, 08.2018, p. 1296-1302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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