How a Racially/Ethnically Diverse and Immigrant Sample Qualitatively Describes the Role of Traditional and Non-traditional Foods in Feeding Their Children

Amanda Trofholz, Kayleen Richardson, Nabila Mohamed, Chaoching Vang, Jerica M. Berge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous research suggests a deleterious impact on dietary quality when people immigrate to the United States and that children influence immigrant parent’s decisions to serve traditional and/or non-traditional foods. Interviews (n = 75) were conducted with Hmong, Somali, and Latino parents of 5–7 year old children about the foods they serve to their children and how the child influences these food decisions. A racially/ethnically diverse team coded interviews using a mixed inductive/deductive approach. Most Latino and Somali parents reported serving mostly traditional foods at home. Regarding feeding decisions, parents reported: (1) allowing children non-traditional foods when requested; (2) “Americanizing” traditional foods; and (3) that children prefer traditional foods. Some Hmong parents reported serving their children non-traditional foods at meals while parents ate traditional foods. Results offer guidance to providers working with immigrant parents of young children regarding maintaining healthful diets when children request potentially unhealthy non-traditional foods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • Hmong
  • Immigrant
  • Latino
  • Qualitative
  • Somali
  • Traditional foods

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'How a Racially/Ethnically Diverse and Immigrant Sample Qualitatively Describes the Role of Traditional and Non-traditional Foods in Feeding Their Children'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this