How a new rule is adjusted to context: Knowledge creation following the implementation of the ISO 9000 quality standard

Alfred Marcus, Eitan Naveh

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper is an analysis of knowledge creation following implementation of the world's leading quality assurance standard, ISO 9000. We combine the perspectives of Nonaka on knowledge creation (Nonaka, 1994; Nonaka & Takeuchi 1995; and Krogh, Nonaka, & Nishiguchi, 2000) with those of authors who have dealt with the dynamics of rules and routines (March, Schulz, & Zhou, 2000; Nelson & Winter, 1982; Cohen & Bacdayan, 1994). On the basis of our analysis of ISO 9000 implementation we develop observations about rules and learning and about rule integration, absorption, and renewal. Our paper fits into the growing literature on the role of learning and knowledge transfer in quality improvement and the evolution of dynamic capabilities in the firm using routines and learning mechanisms such as knowledge codification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-126
Number of pages21
JournalInternational Journal of Organizational Analysis
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2005

Keywords

  • Knowledge creation
  • Knowledge transfer
  • Quality improvement
  • Quality standards
  • Routines
  • Rules

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