Housing segregation and black employment: another look at the ghetto dispersal strategy( US).

S. L. Myers, K. E. Phillips

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    6 Scopus citations

    Abstract

    Whether by design or by accident, ghetto dispersal may be a suboptimal means of improving the economic status of poor urban blacks. The empirical evidence is mixed. In a number of isolated cases wages and employment really are higher in suburban labor markets. Support is found for the notion that the demand for low-skilled workers exceeds the supply in suburban areas. Moreover, poor blacks and whites appear to have similar employment experiences in the suburbs. The isolated evidence does not support the view of racial discrimination in suburban labor markets. However, support is found for the view that there are positive externalities in employment in one's own community. The isolated evidence suggests that poor workers who both live and work in census tracts of similar racial composition have better employment experiences.-Author

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Pages (from-to)298-302
    Number of pages5
    JournalAmerican Economic Review
    Volume69
    Issue number2
    StatePublished - Jan 1 1979

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