Household food insecurity is associated with greater prevalence and 18-month incidence of a range of disordered eating behaviors in a racially and ethnically diverse sample of parents

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Abstract

This study examined cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between household food insecurity (FI) and a range of disordered eating behaviors (DEBs) and explored whether associations differ by Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)/Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) participation. Data came from 1120 racially/ethnically diverse parents (Mage = 35.7 ± 7.8 years at baseline) in the Family Matters longitudinal cohort study. Parents reported on household FI and SNAP/WIC participation at baseline, and on past-year restrictive weight-control behaviors (WCBs; e.g., fasting), compensatory WCBs (e.g., self-induced vomiting), and binge eating at baseline and 18-month follow-up. Sociodemographics-adjusted modified Poisson regressions examined baseline household FI in relation to baseline prevalence and 18-month incidence (i.e., new onset) of each type of DEB. Moderation by SNAP/WIC participation was also tested. Household FI affected 29.6 % of participants and was associated with significantly greater baseline prevalence (prevalence ratios ranging from 1.38 to 2.69) and 18-month incidence (risk ratios ranging from 1.63 to 2.93) of each type of DEB examined. The association between household FI and incident compensatory WCBs differed significantly by SNAP/WIC participation, such that household FI significantly predicted new-onset compensatory WCBs at follow-up only among those participating in SNAP/WIC. Results from this study are the first, to our knowledge, to demonstrate that FI is longitudinally associated with restrictive and compensatory DEBs, thereby highlighting FI as a risk factor not only for binge eating, but for a range of DEBs. These findings emphasize the importance of screening for FI in clinical settings and the need to address structural barriers to food security.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101728
JournalEating Behaviors
Volume49
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Role of Funding Sources: This research was supported by grant numbers R01HL126171, R01HL160587, and R01HL156994 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (PI on all three R01s: Berge). JN de Brito's time was supported by grant number K12HD055887 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (PI: Berge). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, or the National Institutes of Health. The National Institutes of Health had no role in the study design, collection, analysis or interpretation of the data, writing the manuscript, or the decision to submit the paper for publication.

Funding Information:
This research was supported by grant numbers R01HL126171, R01HL160587, and R01HL156994 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (PI on all three R01s: Berge). JN de Brito's time was supported by grant number K12HD055887 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (PI: Berge). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, or the National Institutes of Health.

Funding Information:
Role of Funding Sources: This research was supported by grant numbers R01HL126171 , R01HL160587 , and R01HL156994 from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (PI on all three R01s: Berge). JN de Brito's time was supported by grant number K12HD055887 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (PI: Berge). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the National Institute of Child Health & Human Development, or the National Institutes of Health. The National Institutes of Health had no role in the study design, collection, analysis or interpretation of the data, writing the manuscript, or the decision to submit the paper for publication.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • Binge eating, ethnic and racial minorities
  • Disordered eating
  • Food assistance
  • Food insecurity
  • Weight-control behaviors

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

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