Host preference and network properties in biotrophic plant–fungal associations

Sergei Põlme, Mohammad Bahram, Hans Jacquemyn, Peter Kennedy, Petr Kohout, Mari Moora, Jane Oja, Maarja Öpik, Lorenzo Pecoraro, Leho Tedersoo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Analytical methods can offer insights into the structure of biological networks, but mechanisms that determine the structure of these networks remain unclear. We conducted a synthesis based on 111 previously published datasets to assess a range of ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that may influence the plant-associated fungal interaction networks. We calculated the relative host effect on fungal community composition and compared nestedness and modularity among different mycorrhizal types and endophytic fungal guilds. We also assessed how plant–fungal network structure was related to host phylogeny, environmental and sampling properties. Orchid mycorrhizal fungal communities responded most strongly to host identity, but the effect of host was similar among all other fungal guilds. Community nestedness, which did not differ among fungal guilds, declined significantly with increasing mean annual precipitation on a global scale. Orchid and ericoid mycorrhizal fungal communities were more modular than ectomycorrhizal and root endophytic communities, with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in an intermediate position. Network properties among a broad suite of plant-associated fungi were largely comparable and generally unrelated to phylogenetic distance among hosts. Instead, network metrics were predominantly affected by sampling and matrix properties, indicating the importance of study design in properly inferring ecological patterns.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1230-1239
Number of pages10
JournalNew Phytologist
Volume217
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

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host preferences
fungal communities
nestedness
Fungi
phylogeny
Phylogeny
mycorrhizal fungi
analytical methods
experimental design
sampling
fungi
synthesis

Keywords

  • endophytes
  • host specificity
  • macroecology
  • modularity
  • mycorrhizal fungi
  • nestedness
  • network analysis
  • phylogenetic distance

Cite this

Põlme, S., Bahram, M., Jacquemyn, H., Kennedy, P., Kohout, P., Moora, M., ... Tedersoo, L. (2018). Host preference and network properties in biotrophic plant–fungal associations. New Phytologist, 217(3), 1230-1239. https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.14895

Host preference and network properties in biotrophic plant–fungal associations. / Põlme, Sergei; Bahram, Mohammad; Jacquemyn, Hans; Kennedy, Peter; Kohout, Petr; Moora, Mari; Oja, Jane; Öpik, Maarja; Pecoraro, Lorenzo; Tedersoo, Leho.

In: New Phytologist, Vol. 217, No. 3, 01.02.2018, p. 1230-1239.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Põlme, S, Bahram, M, Jacquemyn, H, Kennedy, P, Kohout, P, Moora, M, Oja, J, Öpik, M, Pecoraro, L & Tedersoo, L 2018, 'Host preference and network properties in biotrophic plant–fungal associations', New Phytologist, vol. 217, no. 3, pp. 1230-1239. https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.14895
Põlme, Sergei ; Bahram, Mohammad ; Jacquemyn, Hans ; Kennedy, Peter ; Kohout, Petr ; Moora, Mari ; Oja, Jane ; Öpik, Maarja ; Pecoraro, Lorenzo ; Tedersoo, Leho. / Host preference and network properties in biotrophic plant–fungal associations. In: New Phytologist. 2018 ; Vol. 217, No. 3. pp. 1230-1239.
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