Host plants and Wolbachia shape the population genetics of sympatric herbivore populations

Zhen Fu, Amanda R. Meier, Brendan Epstein, Alan O. Bergland, Carmen I. Castillo Carrillo, William R. Cooper, Regina K. Cruzado, David R. Horton, Andrew S. Jensen, Joanna L. Kelley, Arash Rashed, Stuart R. Reitz, Silvia I. Rondon, Jenita Thinakaran, Erik J. Wenninger, Carrie H. Wohleb, David W. Crowder, William E. Snyder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Changing climate and land-use practices have the potential to bring previously isolated populations of pest insects into new sympatry. This heightens the need to better understand how differing patterns of host–plant association, and unique endosymbionts, serve to promote genetic isolation or integration. We addressed these factors in populations of potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc), a generalist herbivore that vectors a bacterial pathogen (Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum, causal pathogen of zebra chip disease) of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). Genome-wide SNP data revealed two major genetic clusters—psyllids collected from potato crops were genetically similar to psyllids found on a common weed, Lycium spp., but dissimilar from those found on another common non-crop host, Solanum dulcamara L. Most psyllids found on Lycium spp. and potato represented a single mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) haplotype that has been suggested to not be native to the region, and whose arrival may have been concurrent with zebra chip disease first emerging. The putatively introduced COI haplotype usually co-occurred with endosymbiotic Wolbachia, while the putatively resident COI haplotype generally did not. Genetic intermediates between the two genetic populations of insects were rare, consistent with recent sympatry or reproductive isolation, although admixture patterns of apparent hybrids were consistent with introgression of genes from introduced into resident populations. Our results suggest that both host–plant associations and endosymbionts are shaping the population genetic structure of sympatric psyllid populations associated with different non-crop hosts. It is of future interest to explicitly examine vectorial capacity of the two populations and their potential hybrids, as population structure and hybridization might alter regional vector capacity and disease outbreaks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2740-2753
Number of pages14
JournalEvolutionary Applications
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by Specialty Crop Research Initiative grant no. 2015‐51181‐24292 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. We thank Elizabeth Magill and Colton Crawford, Washington State University, for their help with DNA extraction and 16S rRNA gene library construction. We also thank Eric Johnson and Paul Etter, SNPSaurus, for troubleshooting and assistance in the early stages of data analysis. The Center for Institutional Research Computing at Washington State University and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute at the University of Minnesota provided computing resources in support of this work.

Funding Information:
This work was supported by Specialty Crop Research Initiative grant no. 2015-51181-24292 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture. We thank Elizabeth Magill and Colton Crawford, Washington State University, for their help with DNA extraction and 16S rRNA gene library construction. We also thank Eric Johnson and Paul Etter, SNPSaurus, for troubleshooting and assistance in the early stages of data analysis. The Center for Institutional Research Computing at Washington State University and the Minnesota Supercomputing Institute at the University of Minnesota provided computing resources in support of this work.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 The Authors. Evolutionary Applications published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd

Keywords

  • herbivore interactions
  • interbreeding
  • pest management
  • plant
  • population genomics
  • Wolbachia

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