Hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and carotid atherosclerosis in women: The study of women's health across the nation (SWAN) heart study

Mary O. Whipple, Tené T. Lewis, Kim Sutton-Tyrrell, Karen A. Matthews, Emma Barinas-Mitchell, Lynda H. Powell, Susan A. Everson-Rose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Purpose-: Depression and hopelessness are associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality; however, few studies have compared these constructs early in the atherogenic process, particularly in women or minorities. Methods-: This cross-sectional study examined associations of hopelessness and depressive symptoms with carotid artery intimal-medial thickening (IMT) in 559 women (62% white, 38% black; mean±SD age, 50.2±2.8 years) without evidence of clinical CVD from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Heart Study. Hopelessness was measured by 2 questionnaire items; depressive symptoms were measured with the 20-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Mean and maximum IMT were assessed by B-mode ultrasonography of the carotid arteries. Results-: Increasing hopelessness was significantly related to higher mean (P=0.0139) and maximum (P=0.0297) IMT in regression models adjusted for age, race, site, income, and CVD risk factors. A weaker pattern of associations was noted for depressive symptoms and mean (P=0.1056) and maximum (P=0.0691) IMT. Modeled simultaneously in a risk factor-adjusted model, hopelessness was related to greater mean IMT (P=0.0217) and maximum IMT (P=0.0409), but depressive symptoms were unrelated to either outcome (P>0.4). No interactions with race or synergistic effects of depressive symptoms and hopelessness were observed. Conclusions-: Among middle-aged women, higher levels of hopelessness are associated with greater subclinical atherosclerosis independent of age, race, income, CVD risk factors, and depressive symptoms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3166-3172
Number of pages7
JournalStroke
Volume40
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2009

Fingerprint

Carotid Artery Diseases
Women's Health
Tunica Intima
Depression
Cardiovascular Diseases
Carotid Arteries
Epidemiologic Studies
Ultrasonography
Atherosclerosis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Morbidity
Mortality

Keywords

  • Atherosclerosis
  • Carotid intimal medial thickness
  • Depression
  • Women

Cite this

Hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and carotid atherosclerosis in women : The study of women's health across the nation (SWAN) heart study. / Whipple, Mary O.; Lewis, Tené T.; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim; Matthews, Karen A.; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma; Powell, Lynda H.; Everson-Rose, Susan A.

In: Stroke, Vol. 40, No. 10, 01.10.2009, p. 3166-3172.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Whipple, Mary O. ; Lewis, Tené T. ; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim ; Matthews, Karen A. ; Barinas-Mitchell, Emma ; Powell, Lynda H. ; Everson-Rose, Susan A. / Hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and carotid atherosclerosis in women : The study of women's health across the nation (SWAN) heart study. In: Stroke. 2009 ; Vol. 40, No. 10. pp. 3166-3172.
@article{4388ed5ca9ea422bb5b51041036959f2,
title = "Hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and carotid atherosclerosis in women: The study of women's health across the nation (SWAN) heart study",
abstract = "Background and Purpose-: Depression and hopelessness are associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality; however, few studies have compared these constructs early in the atherogenic process, particularly in women or minorities. Methods-: This cross-sectional study examined associations of hopelessness and depressive symptoms with carotid artery intimal-medial thickening (IMT) in 559 women (62{\%} white, 38{\%} black; mean±SD age, 50.2±2.8 years) without evidence of clinical CVD from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Heart Study. Hopelessness was measured by 2 questionnaire items; depressive symptoms were measured with the 20-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Mean and maximum IMT were assessed by B-mode ultrasonography of the carotid arteries. Results-: Increasing hopelessness was significantly related to higher mean (P=0.0139) and maximum (P=0.0297) IMT in regression models adjusted for age, race, site, income, and CVD risk factors. A weaker pattern of associations was noted for depressive symptoms and mean (P=0.1056) and maximum (P=0.0691) IMT. Modeled simultaneously in a risk factor-adjusted model, hopelessness was related to greater mean IMT (P=0.0217) and maximum IMT (P=0.0409), but depressive symptoms were unrelated to either outcome (P>0.4). No interactions with race or synergistic effects of depressive symptoms and hopelessness were observed. Conclusions-: Among middle-aged women, higher levels of hopelessness are associated with greater subclinical atherosclerosis independent of age, race, income, CVD risk factors, and depressive symptoms.",
keywords = "Atherosclerosis, Carotid intimal medial thickness, Depression, Women",
author = "Whipple, {Mary O.} and Lewis, {Ten{\'e} T.} and Kim Sutton-Tyrrell and Matthews, {Karen A.} and Emma Barinas-Mitchell and Powell, {Lynda H.} and Everson-Rose, {Susan A.}",
year = "2009",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1161/STROKEAHA.109.554519",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "40",
pages = "3166--3172",
journal = "Stroke",
issn = "0039-2499",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and carotid atherosclerosis in women

T2 - The study of women's health across the nation (SWAN) heart study

AU - Whipple, Mary O.

AU - Lewis, Tené T.

AU - Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim

AU - Matthews, Karen A.

AU - Barinas-Mitchell, Emma

AU - Powell, Lynda H.

AU - Everson-Rose, Susan A.

PY - 2009/10/1

Y1 - 2009/10/1

N2 - Background and Purpose-: Depression and hopelessness are associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality; however, few studies have compared these constructs early in the atherogenic process, particularly in women or minorities. Methods-: This cross-sectional study examined associations of hopelessness and depressive symptoms with carotid artery intimal-medial thickening (IMT) in 559 women (62% white, 38% black; mean±SD age, 50.2±2.8 years) without evidence of clinical CVD from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Heart Study. Hopelessness was measured by 2 questionnaire items; depressive symptoms were measured with the 20-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Mean and maximum IMT were assessed by B-mode ultrasonography of the carotid arteries. Results-: Increasing hopelessness was significantly related to higher mean (P=0.0139) and maximum (P=0.0297) IMT in regression models adjusted for age, race, site, income, and CVD risk factors. A weaker pattern of associations was noted for depressive symptoms and mean (P=0.1056) and maximum (P=0.0691) IMT. Modeled simultaneously in a risk factor-adjusted model, hopelessness was related to greater mean IMT (P=0.0217) and maximum IMT (P=0.0409), but depressive symptoms were unrelated to either outcome (P>0.4). No interactions with race or synergistic effects of depressive symptoms and hopelessness were observed. Conclusions-: Among middle-aged women, higher levels of hopelessness are associated with greater subclinical atherosclerosis independent of age, race, income, CVD risk factors, and depressive symptoms.

AB - Background and Purpose-: Depression and hopelessness are associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) morbidity and mortality; however, few studies have compared these constructs early in the atherogenic process, particularly in women or minorities. Methods-: This cross-sectional study examined associations of hopelessness and depressive symptoms with carotid artery intimal-medial thickening (IMT) in 559 women (62% white, 38% black; mean±SD age, 50.2±2.8 years) without evidence of clinical CVD from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) Heart Study. Hopelessness was measured by 2 questionnaire items; depressive symptoms were measured with the 20-item Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Mean and maximum IMT were assessed by B-mode ultrasonography of the carotid arteries. Results-: Increasing hopelessness was significantly related to higher mean (P=0.0139) and maximum (P=0.0297) IMT in regression models adjusted for age, race, site, income, and CVD risk factors. A weaker pattern of associations was noted for depressive symptoms and mean (P=0.1056) and maximum (P=0.0691) IMT. Modeled simultaneously in a risk factor-adjusted model, hopelessness was related to greater mean IMT (P=0.0217) and maximum IMT (P=0.0409), but depressive symptoms were unrelated to either outcome (P>0.4). No interactions with race or synergistic effects of depressive symptoms and hopelessness were observed. Conclusions-: Among middle-aged women, higher levels of hopelessness are associated with greater subclinical atherosclerosis independent of age, race, income, CVD risk factors, and depressive symptoms.

KW - Atherosclerosis

KW - Carotid intimal medial thickness

KW - Depression

KW - Women

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=70349686744&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=70349686744&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1161/STROKEAHA.109.554519

DO - 10.1161/STROKEAHA.109.554519

M3 - Article

C2 - 19713542

AN - SCOPUS:70349686744

VL - 40

SP - 3166

EP - 3172

JO - Stroke

JF - Stroke

SN - 0039-2499

IS - 10

ER -