Home-based transcranial direct current stimulation plus tracking training therapy in people with stroke: An open-label feasibility study 11 Medical and Health Sciences 1117 Public Health and Health Services

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is an effective neuromodulation adjunct to repetitive motor training in promoting motor recovery post-stroke. Finger tracking training is motor training whereby people with stroke use the impaired index finger to trace waveform-shaped lines on a monitor. Our aims were to assess the feasibility and safety of a telerehabilitation program consisting of tDCS and finger tracking training through questionnaires on ease of use, adverse symptoms, and quantitative assessments of motor function and cognition. We believe this telerehabilitation program will be safe and feasible, and may reduce patient and clinic costs. Methods: Six participants with hemiplegia post-stroke [mean (SD) age was 61 (10) years; 3 women; mean (SD) time post-stroke was 5.5 (6.5) years] received five 20-min tDCS sessions and finger tracking training provided through telecommunication. Safety measurements included the Digit Span Forward Test for memory, a survey of symptoms, and the Box and Block test for motor function. We assessed feasibility by adherence to treatment and by a questionnaire on ease of equipment use. We reported descriptive statistics on all outcome measures. Results: Participants completed all treatment sessions with no adverse events. Also, 83.33% of participants found the set-up easy, and all were comfortable with the devices. There was 100% adherence to the sessions and all recommended telerehabilitation. Conclusions: tDCS with finger tracking training delivered through telerehabilitation was safe, feasible, and has the potential to be a cost-effective home-based therapy for post-stroke motor rehabilitation. Trial registration: NCT02460809 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number83
JournalJournal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 18 2018

Fingerprint

Feasibility Studies
Fingers
Health Services
Public Health
Stroke
Health
Therapeutics
Safety
Telecommunications
Costs and Cost Analysis
Equipment and Supplies
Hemiplegia
Symptom Assessment
Cognition
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation
Telerehabilitation
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Neurological rehabilitation
  • Physical therapy
  • Stroke
  • Telerehabilitation
  • Transcranial direct current stimulation

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Clinical Trial
  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Cite this

@article{c2063c9294104375ae73c4ac054f722b,
title = "Home-based transcranial direct current stimulation plus tracking training therapy in people with stroke: An open-label feasibility study 11 Medical and Health Sciences 1117 Public Health and Health Services",
abstract = "Background: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is an effective neuromodulation adjunct to repetitive motor training in promoting motor recovery post-stroke. Finger tracking training is motor training whereby people with stroke use the impaired index finger to trace waveform-shaped lines on a monitor. Our aims were to assess the feasibility and safety of a telerehabilitation program consisting of tDCS and finger tracking training through questionnaires on ease of use, adverse symptoms, and quantitative assessments of motor function and cognition. We believe this telerehabilitation program will be safe and feasible, and may reduce patient and clinic costs. Methods: Six participants with hemiplegia post-stroke [mean (SD) age was 61 (10) years; 3 women; mean (SD) time post-stroke was 5.5 (6.5) years] received five 20-min tDCS sessions and finger tracking training provided through telecommunication. Safety measurements included the Digit Span Forward Test for memory, a survey of symptoms, and the Box and Block test for motor function. We assessed feasibility by adherence to treatment and by a questionnaire on ease of equipment use. We reported descriptive statistics on all outcome measures. Results: Participants completed all treatment sessions with no adverse events. Also, 83.33{\%} of participants found the set-up easy, and all were comfortable with the devices. There was 100{\%} adherence to the sessions and all recommended telerehabilitation. Conclusions: tDCS with finger tracking training delivered through telerehabilitation was safe, feasible, and has the potential to be a cost-effective home-based therapy for post-stroke motor rehabilitation. Trial registration: NCT02460809 (ClinicalTrials.gov).",
keywords = "Neurological rehabilitation, Physical therapy, Stroke, Telerehabilitation, Transcranial direct current stimulation",
author = "{Van De Winckel}, Ann and Carey, {James R.} and Bisson, {Teresa A.} and Hauschildt, {Elsa C.} and Streib, {Christopher D.} and Durfee, {William K.}",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1186/s12984-018-0427-2",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "15",
journal = "Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation",
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T1 - Home-based transcranial direct current stimulation plus tracking training therapy in people with stroke

T2 - An open-label feasibility study 11 Medical and Health Sciences 1117 Public Health and Health Services

AU - Van De Winckel, Ann

AU - Carey, James R.

AU - Bisson, Teresa A.

AU - Hauschildt, Elsa C.

AU - Streib, Christopher D.

AU - Durfee, William K.

PY - 2018/9/18

Y1 - 2018/9/18

N2 - Background: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is an effective neuromodulation adjunct to repetitive motor training in promoting motor recovery post-stroke. Finger tracking training is motor training whereby people with stroke use the impaired index finger to trace waveform-shaped lines on a monitor. Our aims were to assess the feasibility and safety of a telerehabilitation program consisting of tDCS and finger tracking training through questionnaires on ease of use, adverse symptoms, and quantitative assessments of motor function and cognition. We believe this telerehabilitation program will be safe and feasible, and may reduce patient and clinic costs. Methods: Six participants with hemiplegia post-stroke [mean (SD) age was 61 (10) years; 3 women; mean (SD) time post-stroke was 5.5 (6.5) years] received five 20-min tDCS sessions and finger tracking training provided through telecommunication. Safety measurements included the Digit Span Forward Test for memory, a survey of symptoms, and the Box and Block test for motor function. We assessed feasibility by adherence to treatment and by a questionnaire on ease of equipment use. We reported descriptive statistics on all outcome measures. Results: Participants completed all treatment sessions with no adverse events. Also, 83.33% of participants found the set-up easy, and all were comfortable with the devices. There was 100% adherence to the sessions and all recommended telerehabilitation. Conclusions: tDCS with finger tracking training delivered through telerehabilitation was safe, feasible, and has the potential to be a cost-effective home-based therapy for post-stroke motor rehabilitation. Trial registration: NCT02460809 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

AB - Background: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is an effective neuromodulation adjunct to repetitive motor training in promoting motor recovery post-stroke. Finger tracking training is motor training whereby people with stroke use the impaired index finger to trace waveform-shaped lines on a monitor. Our aims were to assess the feasibility and safety of a telerehabilitation program consisting of tDCS and finger tracking training through questionnaires on ease of use, adverse symptoms, and quantitative assessments of motor function and cognition. We believe this telerehabilitation program will be safe and feasible, and may reduce patient and clinic costs. Methods: Six participants with hemiplegia post-stroke [mean (SD) age was 61 (10) years; 3 women; mean (SD) time post-stroke was 5.5 (6.5) years] received five 20-min tDCS sessions and finger tracking training provided through telecommunication. Safety measurements included the Digit Span Forward Test for memory, a survey of symptoms, and the Box and Block test for motor function. We assessed feasibility by adherence to treatment and by a questionnaire on ease of equipment use. We reported descriptive statistics on all outcome measures. Results: Participants completed all treatment sessions with no adverse events. Also, 83.33% of participants found the set-up easy, and all were comfortable with the devices. There was 100% adherence to the sessions and all recommended telerehabilitation. Conclusions: tDCS with finger tracking training delivered through telerehabilitation was safe, feasible, and has the potential to be a cost-effective home-based therapy for post-stroke motor rehabilitation. Trial registration: NCT02460809 (ClinicalTrials.gov).

KW - Neurological rehabilitation

KW - Physical therapy

KW - Stroke

KW - Telerehabilitation

KW - Transcranial direct current stimulation

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