Holocene hydrologic and hydrochemical changes of the South Basin of Lake Manitoba, Canada, inferred from ostracode shell chemistry and autoecology

Emi Ito, Richard M. Forester

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Holocene record of ostracode shell chemistry from the South Basin of Lake Manitoba shows how isostatically and climatically induced changes in the surface and groundwater input to the overall hydrologic budget affected the hydrochemistry. The shallow South Basin experienced periods of extensive shell transport from isolated pools and groundwater seeps, as suggested by disparate chemistry of Fabaerformiscandona rawsoni shells from the same 1-cm-thick sediment sample. Temporal changes reconstructed from ostracode species and F. rawsoni shell chemistry include, for some depth intervals, shells of individuals that were not living at the same time or were not living at the core site. Shell chemistry before the South and North Basins became connected at 1850 BP broadly show a hydrologically closed-basin behavior with alternating periods of a more and less stressful environment to ostracodes. F. rawsoni with high δ18O and low Mg/Ca or low δ18O and high Mg/Ca were likely transported from marginal evaporated pools or groundwater seeps. Overall δ18O and δ13C values increase over time, but at levels for which multiple analyses were made, the values show a wide range, and indicate a highly variable hydrochemical environment both spatially and temporally (over one summer or multiple summers).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-124
Number of pages28
JournalHydrobiologia
Volume786
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2016, Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

Copyright:
Copyright 2017 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Autoecology
  • Hydrochemistry
  • Hydrology
  • Lake Manitoba South Basin
  • Ostracodes
  • Shell chemistry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Holocene hydrologic and hydrochemical changes of the South Basin of Lake Manitoba, Canada, inferred from ostracode shell chemistry and autoecology'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this