HIV risk exposure of injecting drug users in Sydney

A. WODAK, A. STOWE, M. W. ROSS, J. GOLD, M. E. MILLER

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialpeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

One thousand two hundred and forty‐five Sydney injecting drug users (IDUs) were interviewed by questionnaire in 1989 to determine demographic and behavioural characteristics. One‐sixth (16.7%) were considered to be at low risk of HIV from either needle sharing or sexual transmission as they had either never shared injecting equipment, or had not shared for years, or cleaned their injecting equipment effectively on 100% of the occasions when they did share; and were either celibate or monogamous or, if they had multiple partners, had not had unsafe sex in the previous 6 months. Over half (50.7%) had either unsafe injecting or sexual behaviour with the remaining third (32.6%) engaging in both unsafe injecting and sexual practises. Women were more at risk from sharing injection equipment than men but men were more at risk from sexual transmission than women. Increasing age was associated with greater likelihood of safer sex but age had no effect on injecting practises. There was no relationship between unsafe injecting and sexual practises. Amphetamine use was associated with low risk injecting practises while heroin use was associated with low risk sexual transmission. These findings indicate appreciable residual risk behaviour sufficient to allow for at least a slow diffusion of HIV among injecting drug users. [Wodak AD, Stowe A, Ross MW, Gold J, Miller ME. HIV risk exposure of injecting drug users in Sydney. Drug Alcohol Rev 1995; 14:213–222]. 1995 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-222
Number of pages10
JournalDrug and Alcohol Review
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1995

Keywords

  • HIV risk
  • amphetamines
  • heroin
  • injecting drug use
  • needle sharing

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