Highly scalable parallel computational models for large-scale RTM process modeling simulations, Part 2: Parallel formulation theory and implementation

R. Kanapady, Kumar K. Tamma, A. Mark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

In Part 2 of this work, we highlight some key elements of the parallel formulation theory and implementational aspect of process modeling and manufacturing applications of composites with particular emphasis on resin transfer molding (RTM). The approaches for simulating process modeling and manufacturing applications of composites include (1) the traditional explicit control-volume finite-element (CV-FE) approach, and (2) a recently developed and new, implicit, pure finite-element (pure FE) approach. SGI Power Challenge and SGI Origin 2000, which are symmetric multiprocessor (SMP) computing platforms, are employed in this study. The issues in implementation and software development of these manufacturing process simulations are parallel algorithm development, data structures, and interprocessor communication strategies, with emphasis on performance and scalability on these symmetric multiprocessors. Fundamental concepts and characteristic features of the proposed scalable parallel algorithms are described and developed with theoretical analysis. Whereas the theoretical formulations and generic design presented in Part 1, the parallel theoretical developments are described in Part 2, and the techniques developed are applied to large-scale problems using Power Challenge and SGI Origin to demonstrate the effectiveness and the practical applicability, which is subsequently presented in Part 3 of this work.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-308
Number of pages22
JournalNumerical Heat Transfer, Part B: Fundamentals
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1999

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