Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Virus Clade 2.3.4.4b Infections in Wild Terrestrial Mammals, United States, 2022

Elizabeth J. Elsmo, Arno Wünschmann, Kimberlee B. Beckmen, Liam E. Broughton-Neiswanger, Elizabeth L. Buckles, Jayne Ellis, Scott D. Fitzgerald, Robert Gerlach, Shawna Hawkins, Hon S. Ip, Julia S. Lankton, Erin M. Lemley, Julianna B. Lenoch, Mary L. Killian, Kristina Lantz, Lindsey Long, Roger Maes, Marta Mainenti, Julie Melotti, Megan E. MoriartyShotaro Nakagun, Rachel M. Ruden, Valerie Shearn-Bochsler, Danielle Thompson, Mia K. Torchetti, Arnaud J. Van Wettere, Annabel G. Wise, Ailam L. Lim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

We describe the pathology of natural infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1) virus of Eurasian lineage Goose/Guangdong clade 2.3.4.4b in 67 wild terrestrial mammals throughout the United States during April 1‒July 21, 2022. Affected mammals include 50 red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), 6 striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis), 4 raccoons (Procyon lotor), 2 bobcats (Lynx rufus), 2 Virginia opossums (Didelphis virginiana), 1 coyote (Canis latrans), 1 fisher (Pekania pennanti), and 1 gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus). Infected mammals showed primarily neurologic signs. Necrotizing meningoencepha-litis, interstitial pneumonia, and myocardial necrosis were the most common lesions; however, species variations in lesion distribution were observed. Genotype analysis of sequences from 48 animals indicates that these cases represent spillover infections from wild birds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2451-2460
Number of pages10
JournalEmerging infectious diseases
Volume29
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 2023
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). All rights reserved.

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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