High school youth and E-cigarettes: The influence of modified risk statements and flavors on E-cigarette packaging

Sherri Jean Katz, Weijia Shi, Meghan Erkkinen, Bruce Lindgren, Dorothy Hatsukami

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: In this paper, we test variations of e-cigarette warning labels on high school youth, alone, and alongside modified risk statements (MRS) and/or flavors, to determine how perceptions of and intentions toward use of e-cigarettes are influenced by these package elements. Methods: An experiment (N = 715 high school youth) varied the warning label participants viewed (FDA warning label/ MarkTen warning label/ abstract warning label) and whether they viewed the label alone or alongside MRS and/or flavors. Results: Drawing upon the Heuristic Systematic Model, we found that youth who view an MRS with any of the warning labels are more likely to engage in counterarguing (compared to the FDA warning label alone), which increases risk perceptions. Additionally, the greater youth perceive the risks associated with e-cigarettes, the lower their intentions of using them, even if they have tried an e-cigarette in the past. Conclusions: Tobacco education and public health messages should encourage youth to evaluate the tobacco industry messages they receive, as counterarguing is associated with higher risk perceptions. Furthermore, fostering increased awareness of the risks associated with e-cigarette use by youth can reduce intentions to use them.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)130-145
Number of pages16
JournalAmerican journal of health behavior
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Research reported in this paper was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse/National Institutes of Health and the FDA Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) R03-DA043022, by a University of Minnesota Grant-In-Aid of Research, Artistry, and Scholarship, and by the Hubbard School of Journalism and Mass Communication's (HSJMC) Paul Brainerd Computer Technology Fund. Research reported in this publication was also supported by NIH grant P30CA077598 utilizing the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core shared resource of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota and by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health Award Number UL1-TR002494. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH, the FDA, NIDA, or the University of Minnesota. We appreciate the participating schools and the work of undergraduate research assistants who helped with data collection.

Funding Information:
Research reported in this paper was supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse/National Institutes of Health and the FDA Center for Tobacco Products (CTP) R03-DA043022, by a University of Minnesota Grant-In-Aid of Research, Artistry, and Scholarship, and by the Hubbard School of Journalism and Mass Communication’s (HSJMC) Paul Brainerd Computer Technology Fund. Research reported in this publication was also supported by NIH grant P30CA077598 utilizing the Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Core shared resource of the Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota and by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health Award Number UL1-TR002494. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIH, the FDA, NIDA, or the University of Minnesota. We appreciate the participating

Publisher Copyright:
© 2020 PNG Publications. All rights reserved.

Copyright:
Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • E-cigarettes
  • Flavors
  • Heuristic Systematic Model
  • Modified risk statements
  • Warning labels

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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