High Protein Pasta is Not More Satiating than High Fiber Pasta at a Lunch Meal, Nor Does it Decrease Mid-Afternoon Snacking in Healthy Men and Women

Renata Korczak, Derek Timm, Rylee Ahnen, William Thomas, Joanne L Slavin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study compared satiety after high protein pasta (16 g protein, 6 g fiber), high fiber pasta (11 g protein, 8 g fiber) or control pasta (11 g protein, 6 g fiber) in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind crossover trial. Participants were 36 healthy and men and women from the University of Minnesota campus. Fasted men and women ate calorie controlled, but macronutrient different pastas at 12:00 pm along with 500 mL of water. The primary outcome was satiety assessed by Visual Analogue Scales at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, and 180 min daily after consuming the pastas. Secondary outcomes were calories consumed at an ad libitum snack at 3:00 pm, calories from food intake, gastrointestinal tolerance, and palatability. No differences were found among the pasta treatments for satiety, snacking, or gastrointestinal tolerance. Men ate significantly more calories for the rest of the (P = 0.007) after the high protein pasta versus the high fiber pasta (1701 ± 154 compared with 1083 ± 154) with control pasta being intermediate to the other treatments. No significant differences were found for gastrointestinal tolerance, but the palatability ratings showed the high protein pasta was less tasty (P = 0.03) and less pleasant (P = 0.01) than the other 2 pastas. Satisfaction was positively associated with pleasantness and negatively associated with aftertaste. Our results do not support the idea that high protein or high fiber pasta produces a greater satiety response compared to pasta with lower amounts of either nutrient. It is likely that since pasta is already a very satiating food, the subjects were unable to differentiate between the 3 conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S2240-S2245
JournalJournal of Food Science
Volume81
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Fingerprint

Lunch
Snacks
lunch
pasta
meals (menu)
Meals
dietary fiber
Proteins
proteins
satiety
Satiety Response
Food
palatability
Visual Analog Scale
Cross-Over Studies
Eating
Placebos
Water
snacks
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • fiber
  • gastrointestinal tolerance
  • protein
  • satiety
  • snacking

Cite this

High Protein Pasta is Not More Satiating than High Fiber Pasta at a Lunch Meal, Nor Does it Decrease Mid-Afternoon Snacking in Healthy Men and Women. / Korczak, Renata; Timm, Derek; Ahnen, Rylee; Thomas, William; Slavin, Joanne L.

In: Journal of Food Science, Vol. 81, No. 9, 01.09.2016, p. S2240-S2245.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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