High-Dose Vitamin E Does Not Decrease the Rate of Chronic Hemolysis in Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency

Gerhard J Johnson, Govind T. Vatassery, Barbara Finkel, David W Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Several observations made during in vitro and in vivo studies of animal and human erythrocytes have indicated that vitamin E may protect erythrocytes from oxidant-induced damage.1 Previous reports from our laboratory have presented evidence indicating that chronic hemolysis secondary to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency is attributable to oxidant-induced erythrocyte-membrane injury.2 3 4 Since vitamin E may function as an antioxidant in erythrocytes, its use in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency accompanied by chronic hemolytic disease has been investigated.1,5,6 Two of these studies indicated that high-dose vitamin E reduced the rate of hemolysis in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency,1,5 whereas no change was observed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1014-1017
Number of pages4
JournalNew England Journal of Medicine
Volume308
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 28 1983

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