Herpes zoster vaccine in the long-Term care setting: A clinical and logistical conundrum

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Abstract

Advancing age is associated with an increased risk of herpes zoster (shingles) infection and latent effects such as postherpetic neuralgia. The herpes zoster vaccine is recommended in those 60 years of age and older and has been shown to prevent both the primary disease and associated complications. While this recommendation applies to those living in long-Term care facilities, there is little clinical evidence to support use in this population. Additionally, there are logistical barriers that may complicate the use of the vaccine. The article examines the evidence for vaccinating residents in long-Term care facilities and discusses logistical barriers to vaccination. Pharmacists and providers may consider life expectancy and other factors when evaluating which patients should receive the vaccination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)33-37
Number of pages5
JournalConsultant Pharmacist
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2016

Keywords

  • Herpes zoster
  • Immunization
  • Long-Term care facility
  • Shingles
  • Vaccine.

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